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Deadline Calendar

January

Leakey Foundation General Research Grants
The Leakey Foundation was formed to further research into human origins. Recent priorities include research into the environment, archaeology, and human paleontology; into the behavior, morphology, and ecology of the great apes and other primate species; and into the behavioral ecology of contemporary hunter-gatherers. Other areas of study are rarely considered. Advanced doctoral students as well as established scientists are eligible for general research grants. The majority of the Foundation's General Research Grants to doctoral students are in the range of $3,000 to a maximum of $13,500; the limit of funding for a single proposal submitted by a post-doctoral applicant or a senior scientist is $22,000. General Research Grants have two application cycles each year, with deadlines falling on January 5 (spring cycle) and July 15 (fall cycle). Decisions for the spring cycle are announced in mid-May. Decisions for the fall cycle are announced in mid-January.

American Antiquarian Society
Offers 11 different short-term residential fellowships and three long-term residential fellowships. Short-term fellowships carry a stipend of $1000/month and are offered for no more than three months. Applications are due for any of the 11 short-term fellowships and one (NEH-sponsored) long-term fellowship on January 15.

Smithsonian Institute Senior and Postdoctoral Fellowships
Fellowships at the Smithsonian Institution provide students and scholars with opportunities to pursue independent research projects in association with members of the Smithsonian professional research staff. Postdoctoral Fellowships of 3 to 12 months are available for scholars who have held the doctoral degree or equivalent for fewer than seven years as of the application deadline. Senior Fellowships of 3 to 12 months are available for scholars who have held the doctoral degree or equivalent for more than seven years as of the application deadline. Applications for senior fellowships may be made up to 18 months in advance. Stipends for senior fellowships are the same as for the postdoctoral program ($40,000 per year), but the Smithsonian's stipend may be matched by other sources of funding, such as a sabbatical salary. Deadline: January 15 (postmark) for awards to begin on or after June 1.

National Science Foundation Sociology Program
The Sociology Program supports basic research on all forms of human social organization—societies, institutions, groups, and demography—and processes of individual and institutional change. The program encourages theoretically focused empirical investigations aimed at improving the explanation of fundamental social processes. Included is research on organizations and organizational behavior, population dynamics, social movements, social groups, labor force participation, stratification and mobility, family, social networks, socialization, gender roles, and the sociology of science and technology. The program supports both original data collections and secondary data analysis that use the full range of quantitative and qualitative methodological tools. Theoretically grounded projects that offer methodological innovations and improvements for data collection and analysis are also welcomed. Full proposals are due January 15.

National Science Foundation Decision, Risk, and Management Sciences
The Decision, Risk, and Management Sciences program supports scientific research directed at increasing the understanding and effectiveness of decision making by individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, doctoral dissertation research, and workshops are funded in the areas of judgment and decision making; decision analysis and decision aids; risk analysis, perception, and communication; societal and public policy decision making; and management science and organizational design. The program also supports small grants for exploratory research of a time-critical or high-risk, potentially transformative nature. Funded research must be relevant to an operational or applied context, grounded in theory, and generalizable. Purely algorithmic management science proposals should be submitted to the Operations Research Program rather than to DRMS. (deadline: January 18)

WSU New Faculty Seed Grants
These grants are sponsored by the WSU Foundation and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research and are designed to encourage junior-level faculty to develop research, creative, or scholarly programs that provide the potential for extramural support. They are open to junior faculty (those that were appointed as assistant professors no earlier than May 16, 2007). Individual awards will be up to a maximum of $25,000; proposals for smaller amounts are encouraged and will be equally competitive. Appropriateness of the budget will be a significant factor in the selection process. See the Application and Guidelines for more information.

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February

National Science Foundation Science and Society
S&S considers proposals that examine questions that arise in the interactions of engineering, science, technology, and society. There are four components: Ethics and Values in Science, Engineering, and Technology (EVS); History and Philosophy of Science, Engineering, and Technology (HPS); Social Studies of Science, Engineering, and Technology (SSS); and Studies of Policy, Science, Engineering, and Technology (SPS). The components overlap, but are distinguished by the different scientific and scholarly orientations they take to the subject matter, as well as by different focuses within the subject area. (deadline: August 1 and February 1)

Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research
The American Philosophical Society's Lewis and Clark Fund encourages exploratory field studies for the collection of specimens and data and to provide the imaginative stimulus that accompanies direct observation. Applications are invited from disciplines with a large dependence on field studies, such as archaeology, anthropology, biology, ecology, geography, geology, linguistics, and paleontology, but grants will not be restricted to these fields. Each grantee will submit a brief report on his or her trip for archiving in the APS Library. Budgets should be limited to travel and related expenses, including personal field equipment. Amounts will depend on travel costs, but will ordinarily be in the range of several hundred dollars up to about $5,000. The deadline is February 1, with notification in May, for work in June and beyond.

National Science Foundation SBE Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants - Sociology Program
The Sociology Program dissertation improvement grants are awarded to support high quality doctoral dissertation research in sociology. The suitability of a research idea is based on the extent to which the research contributes to sociological theory and knowledge, not on specific topics. Grants are for direct research costs associated with either original data collection or the analysis of existing data sets. Direct research costs may include such things as data set acquisition, additional statistical or methodological training through ICPSR (Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research), meeting with scholars associated with the original data set, and fieldwork away from the student's home campus. Full proposals are due February 15.

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March

Phillips Fund Grant for Native American Research
The Phillips Fund of the American Philosophical Society provides grants for research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory, and the history of studies of Native Americans, in the continental United States and Canada. The grants are intended for such costs as travel, tapes, films, and consultants' fees but not for the purchase of books or permanent equipment. The committee prefers to support the work of younger scholars who have received the doctorate. Applications are also accepted from graduate students for research on master's theses or doctoral dissertations. The average award is about $2,500; grants do not exceed $3,000. Grants are given for one year following the date of the award. Applications are due by March 2.

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April

NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
NEH invites proposals for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in all areas of the humanities. Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants may involve:

  • Research that brings new digital approaches to the study of the humanities or that examines the implications of the use of emerging technologies for humanities scholarship;
  • New digital modes of publication facilitating the dissemination of humanities scholarship in advanced academic as well as informal or formal educational settings at all academic levels;
  • Exploration of digital methods or approaches to preserve, archive, and make accessible traditional (i.e., analogue) and "new media" resources in the humanities;
  • Planning new digital tools for preserving, analyzing, and making accessible humanities data; and
  • Programs addressing the innovative use of emerging digital technologies in formal and informal educational settings, including public forums such as museums, libraries, historic sites, and broadcast media, and K-12 schools and post-secondary institutions.

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants should result in plans, prototypes, or proofs of concept for long-term digital humanities projects prior to implementation. (April 8 deadline, based on last year's cycle)

Foundation for the Future Research Grants
Future of Humanity Grants: $5,000–$25,000 only for subjects that are of interest to the Foundation listed on our Subjects page. Individuals and organizations may apply for grants in subjects that are of interest to the Foundation For the Future. The Foundation Research Grants Program accepts only the Preliminary Grant Application, submitted electronically from this Web site, as the first contact from applicants who want to be considered for grant awards.
     The Foundation Research Grants Program has a two-step process. Only applicants whose Preliminary Grant Applications have been officially accepted may proceed to the second step, the Formal Grant Proposal.
     Foundation grants range in amounts from $5,000 to $25,000 depending upon the scope of the project. Preliminary applications may be submitted between January 1 and April 30.

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May

NEH Fellowships and Faculty Research Awards
These support individuals pursuing advanced research in the humanities that contributes to scholarly knowledge or to the general public's understanding of the humanities. Recipients usually produce scholarly articles, monographs on specialized subjects, books on broad topics, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly tools. Fellowships support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of 6 to 12 months. Applicants may be faculty or staff members of colleges, universities, or primary or secondary schools, or they may be independent scholars or writers. The awards support the equivalent of 6 to 12 months of full-time work. Applications are accepted between March 3 and May 1.

NEH Fellowships: Advanced Social Science Research on Japan
The Fellowship Program for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan is a joint activity of the Japan–U.S. Friendship Commission and the National Endowment for the Humanities. It supports research on the modern Japanese political economy, international relations and society, and on U.S.–Japan relations. The program also encourages innovative research that puts these subjects in wider regional and global contexts and is comparative and contemporary in nature. Research should contribute to scholarly knowledge or to the general public's understanding of the humanities. Disciplines include anthropology, economics, geography, history, international relations, linguistics, political science, psychology, public administration, and sociology. The fellowships are designed for researchers with advanced language skills whose research will require use of data, sources, and documents in their original languages or collected through interviews onsite in direct one-on-one contact. Fellows may undertake their projects in Japan, the United States, or both and may include work in other countries for comparative purposes. Fellows usually produce scholarly articles, monographs on specialized subjects, books on broad topics, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly tools. Fellowships cover an uninterrupted period lasting from 6 to 12 months. An award of $24,000 supports 6 to 8 months of full-time work; an award of $40,000 supports 9 to 12 months of full-time work. Applications are accepted between March 3 and May 1.

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June

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July

Leakey Foundation General Research Grants
The Leakey Foundation was formed to further research into human origins. Recent priorities include research into the environment, archaeology, and human paleontology; into the behavior, morphology, and ecology of the great apes and other primate species; and into the behavioral ecology of contemporary hunter-gatherers. Other areas of study are rarely considered. Advanced doctoral students as well as established scientists are eligible for general research grants. The majority of the Foundation's General Research Grants to doctoral students are in the range of $3,000 to a maximum of $13,500; the limit of funding for a single proposal submitted by a post-doctoral applicant or a senior scientists is $22,000. General Research Grants have two application cycles each year, with deadlines falling on January 5 (spring cycle) and July 15 (fall cycle). Decisions for the spring cycle are announced in mid-May. Decisions for the fall cycle are announced in mid-January.

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August

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Research Grants
The foundation welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world.
     Particular questions that interest the foundation concern violence, aggression, and dominance in relation to social change; the socialization of children, inter-group conflict, drug trafficking and use, and family relationships; as well as the control of aggression and violence. Research with no useful relevance to understanding and attempting to cope with problems of human violence and aggression will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources. Proposal deadline is August 1.

National Science Foundation Science and Society
S&S considers proposals that examine questions that arise in the interactions of engineering, science, technology, and society. There are four components: Ethics and Values in Science, Engineering, and Technology (EVS); History and Philosophy of Science, Engineering, and Technology (HPS); Social Studies of Science, Engineering, and Technology (SSS); and Studies of Policy, Science, Engineering, and Technology (SPS). The components overlap, but are distinguished by the different scientific and scholarly orientations they take to the subject matter, as well as by different focuses within the subject area.  (deadline: August 1 and February 1)

National Science Foundation Political Science
The Political Science Program supports scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of citizenship, government, and politics. Research proposals are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented. Substantive areas include, but are not limited to, American government and politics, comparative government and politics, international relations, political behavior, political economy, and political institutions. In recent years, program awards have supported research projects on bargaining processes; campaigns and elections, electoral choice, and electoral systems; citizen support in emerging and established democracies; democratization, political change, and regime transitions; domestic and international conflict; international political economy; party activism; political psychology and political tolerance. The program also has supported research experiences for undergraduate students and infrastructural activities, including methodological innovations, in the discipline. (deadline: August 15)

National Science Foundation Cultural Anthropology
The Cultural Anthropology Program promotes basic scientific research on the causes and consequences of human social and cultural variation. The program solicits research proposals of theoretical importance in all substantive and theoretical sub-fields within the discipline of cultural anthropology. (deadline: August 16)

National Science Foundation Cultural Anthropology Scholars Awards
The National Science Foundation announces an opportunity for methodological training by cultural anthropologists who are active researchers. The purpose is to help cultural anthropologists upgrade their methodological skills by learning a specific analytical technique which will improve their research abilities. (deadline: August 16)

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September

NEH -Summer Stipends
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that contributes to scholarly knowledge or to the public's understanding of the humanities. Recipients usually produce scholarly articles, monographs on specialized subjects, books on broad topics, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly tools. Summer Stipends support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Applicants may be faculty or staff members of colleges, universities, or primary or secondary schools, or they may be independent scholars or writers. Successful applicants receive an outright award of $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Internal WSU deadline: September 2.

NEH - America's Historical and Cultural Organizations Planning Grants
Planning grants can be used to plan, refine, and develop the content and interpretive approach of programs that reach broad audiences, including exhibitions, interpretation at historic sites and houses, reading and discussion programs, Web-based or other digital projects, or other public programs that encourage discussion, analysis, and reflection in the humanities. Applicants should have already conducted preliminary consultation with scholars to help shape the humanities content of the project and with other programming advisers appropriate to the project's format. Deadline: September 5.

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation
The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields (natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, creative arts) except the performing arts. The Foundation only supports individuals. It does not make grants to institutions or organizations. The Fellowships are awarded to men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. The Foundation consults with distinguished scholars and artists regarding the accomplishments and promise of the applicants and presents this evidence to the Committee of Selection. Appointments are ordinarily made for one year, and in no instance for a period shorter than six consecutive months. The amounts of the grants will be adjusted to the needs of the Fellows, considering their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Members of the teaching profession receiving sabbatical leave on full or part salary are eligible for appointment, as are holders of other Fellowships and of appointments at research centers. The Foundation selects its Fellows on the basis of two separate competitions, one for the United States and Canada, the other for Latin America and the Caribbean. The deadline for submitting applications for 2009 US/Canada competition is September 15. The application forms will be available June 2009.

National Science Foundation Documenting Endangered Languages
This multi-year funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of an estimated half of the 6,000–7,000 currently used human languages, this effort aims also to exploit advances in information technology. Funding will support fieldwork and other activities relevant to recording, documenting, and archiving endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year project grants as well as fellowships for up to 12 months. At least half the available funding will be awarded to projects involving fieldwork.  The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History will participate in the partnership as a research host, a non-funding role. (deadline: September 15)

ACLS Fellowship Program
The program invites research applications in all disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences.The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant that will take the form of a monograph or other equally substantial form of scholarship. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects. The ACLS Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote 6 to 12 continuous months to full-time research and writing. An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate's current academic year salary. Applications are due September 30.

Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowships
Amount: $64,000, plus $2,500 for research and travel, and the possibility of an additional summer's support.
Tenure: One academic year, plus one summer if justified by a persuasive case.
     The ACLS invites applications for the sixth annual competition for the Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowships, generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in honor of Charles A. Ryskamp, literary scholar, distinguished library and museum director, and long-serving trustee of the Foundation. These fellowships support advanced assistant professors and untenured associate professors in the humanities and related social sciences whose scholarly contributions have advanced their fields and who have well designed and carefully developed plans for new research. The fellowships are intended to provide time and resources to enable these faculty members to conduct their research under optimal conditions. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant that will take the form of a monograph or other equally substantial form of scholarship. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects. Applications are due September 30.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships
The ACLS invites applications for the second annual competition for the ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships thanks to the generous assistance of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences. It is hoped that projects of successful applicants will help advance digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating further such works. ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended to support an academic year dedicated to work on a major scholarly project that takes a digital form. Projects may involve development of new digital tools that further humanistic research (such as digital research archives or innovative databases), research that depends on or is greatly enhanced by the use of such tools, the representation of research that depends on or is greatly enhanced by the use of such tools, or some combination of these features. ACLS does not support creative works (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translations, or purely pedagogical projects. The ACLS will award up to five ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships in this competition year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of up to $60,000 towards an academic year's leave and provides for project costs of up to $25,000. Applications are due September 30.

ACLS Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars
ACLS invites applications for the tenth annual competition for the Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars, owing to the generous assistance of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Burkhardt Fellowships are intended to support an academic year (normally nine months) of residence at any one of the national residential research centers participating in the program. Such an environment, beyond providing free time, encourages exchanges across disciplinary lines that can be especially helpful to deepening and expanding the significance of projects in the humanities and related social sciences. Candidates must also commit themselves to relocating as needed in order to be in residence for the tenure of the fellowship. ACLS will award up to nine Burkhardt Fellowships, depending on the availability of funds, in this competition year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $75,000. Applications are due September 30.

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October

American Philosophical Society's Franklin Research Grants
Franklin awards are small grants designed to meet the costs of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies, or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses. Applicants are expected to have a doctorate or to have published work of doctoral character and quality. Funding is offered up to a maximum of $6,000 for use in calendar year 2009. The next deadline is October 1, for a January decision for work in February through December.

American Antiquarian Society Fellowships for Creative and Performing Artists and Writers
The American Antiquarian Society (AAS), a national research library and learned society of American history and culture, is calling for applications for visiting fellowships for historical research by creative and performing artists, writers, film makers, journalists, and other persons whose goals are to produce imaginative, non-formulaic works dealing with pre-twentieth-century American history. Successful applicants are those whose work is for the general public rather than for academic or educational audiences. The Society's goal in sponsoring this program is to multiply and improve the ways in which an understanding of history is communicated to the American people. Applications are due October 5.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Accepting Applications for Scholars in Health Policy Research
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Research program is designed to help develop a new generation of creative health policy thinkers and researchers within the disciplines of economics, political science, and sociology. Each year the program selects up to nine highly qualified individuals for two-year fellowships at one of three nationally prominent universities with the expectation that they will make important research contributions to future health policy in the United States. The program invites recent graduates of doctoral programs in economics, political science, and sociology, including junior faculty, to apply. Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously worked extensively in health or health policy research. Applicants must have received a doctoral degree after January 1, 2005, but no later than July 2010. For those expecting to receive degrees in 2010, all degree requirements must be completed by July 15, 2010. All applicants must be citizens of the United States or its territories or have permanent residency status at the time of application. Applications are encouraged from candidates who come from groups that historically have been underrepresented in the three disciplines. Scholars will receive stipends from their university of $89,000 a year. Complete program information is available at the RWJF Web site. Applications are due October 21.

National Science Foundation Archaeometry – Senior Research
The Archaeology Program provides support for anthropologically relevant archaeological research at both a "senior" and doctoral dissertation level. It also funds anthropologically significant archaeometric research. High risk exploratory research proposals are accepted for consideration, and a description of these competitions is provided in the Archaeology Program Overview. (deadline: October 31)

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November

National Endowment for the Humanities - Collaborative Research Grants
Collaborative Research Grants support original research undertaken by a team of two or more scholars; or research coordinated by an individual scholar that, because of its scope or complexity, requires additional staff and resources beyond the individual's salary. Eligible projects include:

  • Research that significantly adds to knowledge and understanding in the humanities.
  • Conferences on topics of major importance in the humanities that will benefit ongoing research.
  • Archaeology projects that interpret and communicate the results of archaeological fieldwork. Projects may encompass excavation, materials analysis, laboratory work, field reports, and preparation of interpretive monographs.
  • Translations into English of works that provide insight into the history, literature, philosophy, and artistic achievements of other cultures.
  • Research that uses the knowledge, methods, and perspectives of the humanities to enhance understanding of science, technology, and medicine.

These grants support full-time or part-time activities for periods of one to three years. Support is available for various combinations of scholars, consultants, and research assistants; project-related travel; field work; applications of information technology; and technical support and services. All grantees are expected to communicate the results of their work to the appropriate scholarly and public audiences. The anticipated deadline is November 1, 2009, for projects beginning July 2010.

NEH-National Digital Newspaper Program
NEH is soliciting proposals from institutions to participate in the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). Ultimately, over a period of approximately 20 years, NDNP will create a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers from all the states and U.S. territories published between 1836 and 1922. This searchable database will be permanently maintained at the Library of Congress and be freely accessible via the Internet. NDNP will be implemented in several phases. The Endowment intends to support projects in all states and U.S. territories provided that sufficient funds allocated for this purpose are available. One organization within each U.S. state or territory will receive an award to collaborate with relevant state partners in this effort. Previously funded projects will be eligible for continued support to digitize pages from new decades, as the program increases its chronological span. During this phase of NDNP, successful applicants will select newspapers—published in their state in English between 1880 and 1910—and convert, primarily from microfilm, over a period of two years, a minimum of 100,000 pages into digital files, according to the technical guidelines outlined by the Library of Congress. (deadline: November 1)

NEH-Scholarly Editions Grants
Scholarly Editions Grants support the preparation by a team of at least two editors and staff of texts and documents that are currently inaccessible or available in inadequate editions. Projects involving significant literary, philosophical, and historical materials are typical in this grant program, but other types of work, such as musical notation, are also eligible. Applicants should demonstrate familiarity with the best practices recommended by the Association for Documentary Editing or the Modern Language Association Committee on Scholarly Editions. Editions produced with NEH support contain scholarly and critical apparatus appropriate to the subject matter and format of the edition. This usually means introductions and annotations that provide essential information about the form, transmission, and historical and intellectual context of the texts and documents involved. Proposals for editions of foreign language materials in the original language are eligible for funding, but proposals for editions of translated materials should be submitted to the Collaborative Research program. (deadline: November 1)

AAUW Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships
One-year support for women who will have earned a doctoral degree by November 15, 2009. The primary purpose of the postdoctoral research leave fellowships is to increase the number of women in tenure-track faculty positions and to promote equity for women in higher education. This fellowship is designed to assist the candidate in obtaining tenure and further promotions by enabling her to spend a year pursuing independent research. Only applicants holding a doctorate classified as a research degree (i.e., Ph.D., Ed.D., D.B.A., D.M.) or an M.F.A. by November 15, 2009, are eligible to apply. Postdoctoral fellowships are available in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences; one is designated for a woman from an underrepresented group in any field. Limited additional funds may be available when matched by the fellow's institution. Applications are due November 15.

The Thatcher Hoffman Smith Prize - Creativity in Motion
This $40,000 prize is offered by the University of Oklahoma's College of Arts and Sciences. It is open to all fields of creativity, including, but not limited to, the arts, cultural affairs, education, and science, and will be awarded to an individual whose creative project is currently underway. The focus of the award is on the creative process itself, not a completed project. In order to apply you must submit a one-page letter of intent postmarked by November 15. The top 50 respondents will be invited to submit full applications. Please visit their Web site for specific instructions for letters of intent.

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December

National Science Foundation Archaeometry Archaeology - Senior Research
The Archaeology Program provides support for anthropologically relevant archaeological research at both a "senior" and doctoral dissertation level. It also funds anthropologically significant archaeometric research. High risk exploratory research proposals are accepted for consideration and a description of these competitions is provided in the Archaeology Program Overview. (deadline: December 1)

American Philosophical Society's Franklin Research Grants
Franklin awards are small grants designed to meet the costs of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies, or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses. Applicants are expected to have a doctorate or to have published work of doctoral character and quality. Funding is offered up to a maximum of $6,000 for use in calendar year 2010. The next deadline is December 6.

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