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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate

Opportunities emerge where art, engineering meet

HuminalIn a cold, dimly blue-lit room, a strange human–animal hybrid paces before the entrance to a fiery red cave. When the “Huminal” senses a viewer approaching, it stops, turns its head to stare at the visitor and emits its own red-hot glow. The viewer must then decide how to respond to the apparent challenge: continue toward the creature or retreat.

The Huminal is an interactive, kinetic sculptural installation featuring an autonomous, mobile robot that senses and responds to changes in its environment. Created by an interdisciplinary team at Washington State University Tri-Cities, it incorporates research and techniques in fine arts, design, electrical and mechanical engineering, and robotics to provide a unique platform for exploring the relationship between humans and machines—and, it turns out, between artists and engineers, too. » More …

Game Day

ControllersImagine running through a fantastical digital world of myth and danger—treasures and ancient artifacts around every corner. Now imagine being a new college graduate and saying “I built that” in a job interview.

Both are reality for the 2017 graduates of the WSU Vancouver Creative Media and Digital Culture program. Last May, the program graduated 28 designers, programmers and developers, all with real-world experience in virtual storytelling already on their resumes.

Read the full story on page 17 in WSU Vancouver’s Crimson and Gray magazine >>

Exploration emphasized in CAS Week of Welcome kickoff

English Whitson week of welcomeTrenton Kirchberg wants to “bridge the gap between China and the United States,” and learning to speak Mandarin Chinese is an important first step toward his goal.

“I want to help alleviate the cultural misunderstandings and tensions between both countries,” the first-year WSU student said while sampling the diverse fare at the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures’ Week of Welcome open house.

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CAS hosts solar eclipse viewing parties

crecent sun through solar glasses Mother Nature provided a special treat for the first day of classes at Washington State University this year: a total solar eclipse across all of the United States. Although the path of totality ran from the Oregon coast all the way through South Carolina, the Vancouver, Tri-Cities, and Pullman campus each experienced more than 93% of the surface of the sun being blocked by the moon. The College of Arts and Sciences hosted a viewing party on the Holland Library lawn and at the Jewett Observatory to help students and the WSU community enjoy and learn about the celestial phenomenon.  Solar glasses were the most popular way to look at the sun–and the only way to do so safely.

At Holland Library, volunteers from the Department of Physics, along with the CAS Student Ambassadors, showed students and community members how to use » More …

Students land Gilman awards to study in Asia, Europe

College of Arts and SciencesThree College of Arts and Sciences students received nationally competitive Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship awards to study-abroad this fall.

The students are:

  • Evan J. Wilson, a junior majoring in international business and marketing and minoring and Chinese-language, will spend the academic year at Kookmin University in Seoul, South Korea.
  • Michael B. Young, a sophomore majoring in Chinese and Japanese language and culture, will spend the academic year studying in Harbin China through the CET Academic Programs’ Intensive Chinese Language program.
  • Alma J. Zamago, a junior majoring in Japanese, will study during the academic year on an exchange with Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan.

» More …

Off the beaten path

monarch butterfly on yellow plant“The monarchs were a big surprise for me,” says Rod Sayler. “It’s the first time I’ve seen them at WSU except for fly-bys. I thought, ‘Wow, it finally happened!’”

Sayler, an unabashed naturalist known for his signature straw hat, is project director for the WSU arboretum and an associate professor in the School of the Environment. In an age of climate specialists and policy wonks, Sayler revels in the down-to-earth study of nature in all its intricate bounty.

For the last nine years, he and his colleagues have painstakingly transformed a wedge of farmland into a botanical garden alive with wildflowers, native bees, meadowlarks, amphibians, rabbits, deer, and more. It’s a campus dream over a century in the making, says Sayler, one that finally came to fruition in 2008.

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History department newsletter, June 2017

Screen shot image of history newsletter2017 has been a year of growth and accolades for the Department of History. The summer newsletter highlights the Roots of Contemporary Issues Program, directed by Professors Jesse Spohnholz and Clif Stratton, which has become a center for transformative learning across the University, plus curriculum innovations, faculty and student awards, alumni updates, and more.

Read the full newsletter on the Department of History website >>