Environment

Keller named director of School of the Environment

Kent Keller, professor and fellow of the Geological Society of America, has been named director of the School of the Environment at Washington State University. A WSU researcher and teacher since 1988, Keller began his career studying geological processes deep under the Earth. Today he studies the critical zone, the vital skin of Earth where […]

Sex that moves mountains: Spawning fish can influence river profiles

It turns out that sex can move mountains. A Washington State University researcher has found that the mating habits of salmon can alter the profile of stream beds, affecting the evolution of an entire watershed. His study is one of the first to quantitatively show that salmon can influence the shape of the land. Alex […]

Undergraduate research enables WSU junior to give back

Washington State University junior Lambert Ngenzi wants to use what he is learning about geospatial analysis to help farmers in rural Africa conserve and manage vital water resources. “Where I come from, water is a big issue,” Ngenzi said. “If I could do something in any way, if I could help the people back home, […]

Ancient Inland Northwest volcanic eruptions blocked out sun, cooling planet

The Pacific Northwest was home to one of the Earth’s largest known volcanic eruptions, a millennia-long spewing of sulfuric gas that blocked out the sun and cooled the planet, Washington State University researchers have determined. “This would have been devastating regionally because of the acid-rain effect from the eruptions,” said John Wolff, a professor in the […]

CAS students receive Carson, Auvil undergraduate research awards

A total of 10 College of Arts and Sciences students received two types of awards from the WSU Office of Undergraduate Research. Recipients of the Carson and Auvil awards will work with faculty mentors throughout the 2017-18 academic year on research, scholarly and creative projects that advance or create new knowledge in a specific field.

Exodus: Climate and the movement of the people

Vast swaths of forests in western North America are dead or dying, killed by pine bark beetle. The beetles have been there all along, but prolonged droughts reduced the trees’ ability to defend themselves from the inner bark-munching bugs. The western slopes of the Sierra Nevada range in California have been especially hard hit by […]

Off the beaten path

“The monarchs were a big surprise for me,” says Rod Sayler. “It’s the first time I’ve seen them at WSU except for fly-bys. I thought, ‘Wow, it finally happened!’” Sayler, an unabashed naturalist known for his signature straw hat, is project director for the WSU arboretum and an associate professor in the School of the […]

WSU researchers find wealth of fish at deep Hawaiian reef

Washington State University marine biologists for the first time have documented a wealth of fish in the “vastly underexplored” deep coral reefs off Hawaii Island. The study gives fishery managers a more complete picture of fish species and habitat around the Big Island, home to a thriving aquarium fish trade, as well as other deep […]

Photographing the elusive, endangered lynx

Deep in the forests of Washington’s Kettle Mountains, Washington State University wildlife biologist Daniel Thornton searches for signs of a rare and elusive type of wild cat — the lynx. An assistant professor in the School of Environmental Science, Thornton and environmental science graduate students Travis King and Arthur Scully are helping to lead the […]

Time, Place, and the River

A research project led by scientists at WSU Vancouver is working to understand how increasing human activity affects the Columbia River, upstream and down. Called CRESCENDO, the Columbia River Scientific Education and Outreach program is a partnership between five Washington high schools along the river and WSU Vancouver that integrates scientific and educational research. CRESCENDO […]