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College of Arts and Sciences Published research/scholarship/creative work

Volatile shifts linked to high‑cost debt

Mariana Amorim.Time, more than money, appears to influence whether service sector employees end up turning to so-called predatory lenders.

“We found the more schedule volatility people experienced, the more likely they were to take out expensive loans, such as those from pawn shops and auto-title lenders—or they use credit cards in ways that are problematic,” said Mariana Amorim, WSU sociologist and » More …

Using the world’s most powerful X-ray telescope

Vivienne Baldassare.One of the biggest questions in astrophysics right now is how do black holes form that are between the size of a stellar and a supermassive black hole? The existence of these intermediate-sized black holes has long been theorized but finding them has proven difficult.

“Most of the theories for their formation rely on conditions that are found only in the very early universe. We wanted to test another theory that » More …

Race and environmental inequality

Children's playground with a smokestack billowing smoke in the background.Although previous research has shown that Black communities statistically suffer environmental problems more than white communities of similar income levels, a recent WSU study found only 33% of U.S. households believe that Black people are more likely to experience environmental pollution and that this well-documented inequality is unfair. » More …

Fighting for Uncle Sam and for civil rights

Buffalo Soldiers: Fighting on two fronts.A new documentary about African Americans who fought in the U.S. military in the late 1800s and early 1900s features expert commentary from Ryan Booth, an assistant professor of history at Washington State University.

“Both the Buffalo Soldiers and the Indian Scouts have been waiting a long time for their story to be told,” Booth said. “My hope is that this documentary gives people a better understanding » More …

Breathing free from opioid addiction

A patient receiving oxygen through a mask.Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may help people being treated for opioid addiction reduce their methadone dose and better manage pain and withdrawal symptoms, according to a pair of studies led by Washington State University scientists.

The idea for the studies came from earlier research by Raymond Quock, professor of psychology, that showed the therapy provided pain relief and reduced physical » More …

Celebrating WSU authors

Crimson Reads 2022: An annual celebration of WSU authors.Three speakers, including a history alumnus and an English faculty poet, kicked off the WSU Libraries’ “Crimson Reads” event in March 2022. The annual showcase highlights the diverse publishing activity and achievements of WSU authors who have authored, co-authored, or edited a book, including e-books, within the past year.

This year’s theme, “Reflections of Home: Contextualizing Meaningful Spaces Through Literature,” included presentations by: » More …

Finding forests’ breaking point

Henry Adams examines needles on a branch..How hot is too hot, and how dry is too dry, for the Earth’s forests? A new study from an international team of researchers, including Henry Adams, assistant professor in the WSU School of the Environment, found the answers by looking at decades of dying trees.

“Widespread forest mortality is occurring worldwide,” said Adams, an expert in drought-caused deaths in trees, such as the iconic Western redcedar which » More …