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CAS Grant and Fellowship Support National Science Foundation

Social Psychology

$300,000 | 7.17.2017; July 15th Annually thereafter; 1.16.2018; January 15 Annually thereafter

The Social Psychology Program at NSF supports basic research on human social behavior, including cultural differences and development over the life span. 

Among the many research topics supported are: attitude formation and change, social cognition, personality processes, interpersonal relations and group processes, the self, emotion, social comparison and social influence, and the psychophysiological and neurophysiological bases of social behavior.

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Perception, Action & Cognition

Funding amount Varies

January 15 – February 1 annually

July 15 – August 1 annually

The PAC program funds theoretically motivated research on a wide-range of topic areas focused on typical human behavior. The aim is to enhance the fundamental understanding of perceptual, motor, and cognitive processes and their interactions. Central research topics for consideration by the program include (but are not limited to) vision, audition, haptics, attention, memory, reasoning, written and spoken language, motor control, categorization, spatial cognition, and the interaction of sleep or emotion with cognitive or perceptual processes. The program welcomes a wide range of perspectives, such as individual differences, symbolic computation, … » More …

Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS): Core Programs

Funds vary on project type

Medium Projects October 12-19 annually

Large Projects October 12-19 annually

Small Projects November 2-16 annually

The Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) studies the inter-related roles of people, computers, and information.  IIS supports research and education activities that 1) develop new knowledge about the role of people in the design and use of information technology; 2) increase our capability to create, manage, and understand data and information in circumstances ranging from personal computers to globally-distributed systems; and 3) advance our understanding of how computational systems can exhibit the hallmarks of intelligence.

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Geography and Spatial Sciences Program (GSS)

Varies | First Thursday in September annually

The Geography and Spatial Sciences Program sponsors research on the geographic distributions and interactions of human, physical, and biotic systems on Earth. Investigators are encouraged to propose plans for research about the nature, causes, and consequences of human activity and natural environmental processes across a range of scales. Projects on a variety of topics qualify for support if they offer promise of contributing to scholarship by enhancing geographical knowledge, concepts, theories, methods, and their application to societal problems and concerns.

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Social Psychology

Varies | January 15 annually; July 15 annually

The Social Psychology Program at NSF supports basic research on human social behavior, including cultural differences and development over the life span. 

Among the many research topics supported are: attitude formation and change, social cognition, personality processes, interpersonal relations and group processes, the self, emotion, social comparison and social influence, and the psychophysiological and neurophysiological bases of social behavior. 

The scientific merit of a proposal depends on four important factors: (1) The problems investigated must be theoretically grounded. (2) The research should be based on empirical observation or be subject to empirical validation. (3) The research design must be … » More …

Developmental and Learning Sciences (DLS)

Varies | January 15 annually; July 15 annually

DLS supports research that addresses developmental processes within the domains of cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development using any appropriate populations for the topics of interest including infants, children, adolescents, adults, and non-human animals. The program also supports research investigating factors that impact development change including family, peers, school, community, culture, media, physical, genetic, and epigenetic influences. Additional priorities include research that: incorporates multidisciplinary, multi-method, microgenetic, and longitudinal approaches; develops new methods, models, and theories for studying learning and development; includes participants from a range of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and  cultures; and integrates different processes (e.g., learning, memory, … » More …

Biological Anthropology

Varies | 11.16.2016; 7.19.2017

The Biological Anthropology Program supports basic research in areas related to human evolution and contemporary human biological variation. Research areas supported by the program include, but are not limited to, human genetic variation, human and nonhuman primate ecology and adaptability, human osteology and bone biology, human and nonhuman primate paleontology, functional anatomy, and primate socioecology. Grants supported in these areas are united by an underlying evolutionary framework, and often by a consideration of adaptation as a central theoretical theme. Many proposals also have a biocultural orientation. The program frequently serves as a bridge within NSF between the social and behavioral sciences … » More …

Biological Anthropology Program – Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (BA-DDRIG)

$20,000 | 3.9.2017; 11.9.2017; 7.11.2018; 3.14.2019; 11.14.2019; 7.9.2020

The Biological Anthropology Program supports multifaceted research which advances scientific knowledge of human biology and ecology, including understanding of our evolutionary history and mechanisms which have shaped human and nonhuman primate biological diversity. Supported research focuses on living and fossil forms of both human and nonhuman primates, addressing time scales ranging from the short-term to evolutionary, encompassing multiple levels of organization and analysis (molecular and organismal, to the population and ecosystem scales), and conducted in field, laboratory, and captive research environments.

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