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CAS in the Media Arts and Sciences Media Headlines

“Immaterial” exhibit showcases three artists diverse works

Io Palmer.
Palmer

The “Immaterial” exhibit, featuring works from Yvette Cummings, Mica Lilith Smith and Io Palmer, is on view at the McCormick Gallery at Midland College.

Each artist’s work differs in subject and appearance, but they express powerful and compelling ideas through physical material. The exhibition highlights physical substances from patterned fabric and paint to bobby pins and furniture as a way to look deeper into the immaterial realms of individual experience and cultural narrative, according to the press release.

Palmer is an associate professor of fine arts at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash. Through depiction of cleaning products, laborers’ garments and various other industrial and domestic forms, Palmer’s works explore the complex issue of class, capitalism and societal excess. Trained originally as a ceramicist, Palmer uses a variety of processes and materials including fabric, steel, sound and wood.
The exhibit is one view through Sept. 30. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. Admission is free.

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mrt

Artist: Mural belongs to ‘everyone’

A year after the idea was first proposed to the Pullman City Council, a mural promoting racial equality is complete and can be viewed downtown on Main Street.

It contains the words “Black Lives Matter,” “End Racism Now” and “Pullman, WA — You Are Welcome Here” on a colorful backdrop of flowers and rolling hills.

Joe Hedges.
Hedges

“We are just over the moon,” project manager Joe Hedges, assistant professor of fine art, said about finishing the painting.

Hedges said the process has been a struggle, “but there were a lot of people in town that never really gave up and were inspired by larger cities and small towns nationwide that had come together to create some kind of public display of a commitment to ending racism.”

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Yahoo!News
Daily News

Center for Arts and Humanities announces fellowship and catalyst award recipients

The Center for Arts and Humanities (CAH) has selected nine faculty to receive the 2021 CAH Fellowships and Catalyst Award.

Faculty receiving the CAH Fellowship for 2021:

  • Avantika Bawa.
    Bawa

    AVANTICA BAWA, Department of Fine Arts

    Bawa will continue an ongoing series of installations reflecting the artist’s interest in responding to the built and natural environment through the language of drawing and construction.

  • Troy Bennefield.
    Bennefield

    TROY BENNEFIELD, School of Music

    Bennefield will explore and publish information on the life and works of Dutch composer Julius Hijman, whose career was interrupted by the Nazi regime. Bennefield will produce the first-ever recordings of Hijman’s compositions.

  • Dennis Dehart.
    Dehart

    DENNIS DeHART, Department of Fine Arts

    DeHart will create a lens-based series of works focused on the Columbia River drainage basin and the Snake River. The exhibition will be in collaboration with the WSU Libraries’ Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections.

  • Martin King.
    King

    MARTIN KING, School of Music

    King will commission a new horn, tuba and piano trio, record an album of music for this ensemble, and give performing tours of this music to expand and diversify the repertoire and promote this ensemble.

  • Laurie Mercier.
    Mercier

    LAURIE MERCIER, Department of History

    Mercier will conduct research for a book project about gendered occupational segregation in the U.S. and Canadian Wests from 1930-2020.

  • Melissa Nicolas.
    Nicolas

    MELISSA NICOLAS, Department of English

    Nicolas will create an open-access digital archive of personal narratives about living through the COVID‑19 pandemic.

  • Jeffrey Sanders.
    Sanders

    JEFF SANDERS, Department of History

    Sanders will develop a book proposal for a cultural and environmental history of strontium 90.

Jacqueline Wilson.
Wilson
  • JACQUELINE WILSON, School of Music

Wilson will create an album of classical works by Indigenous composers for solo bassoon utilizing a decolonized approach.

Faculty receiving the CAH Catalyst Award for 2021:

  • Ruth Gregory.
    Gregory

    RUTH GREGORY, Digital Technology and Culture Program

    Gregory will pursue multiple grant proposals to the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Spencer Foundation, and provide paid internships for community engaged humanities students.

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WSU Insider

Top Ten Senior Awards

For more than 80 years, Washington State University has recognized 10 of the top seniors in each graduating class. The WSU Alumni Association selects these women and men who represent the highest standards in specific aspects of the college experience, including academics, athletics, campus involvement, community service, and visual and performing arts.

Five CAS students were among the Top 10 of 2021.

Kyle Kopta.
Kopta

Kyle Kopta

VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS

  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • Digital Technology and Culture
  • WSU Tri-Cities
  • Hermiston, Oregon
Samantha King-Shaw.
King-Shaw

Samantha King-Shaw

ACADEMICS

  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies
  • WSU Pullman
  • Sparks, Nevada
Brandt Fisher.
Fisher

Brandt Fisher

VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS

  • College of Arts and Sciences, Honors College
  • Music performance in saxophone with an emphasis in jazz
  • WSU Pullman
  • Edmonds, Washington
Dallas Hobbs.
Hobbs

Dallas Hobbs

ATHLETICS

  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • Digital Technology & Culture, Fine Arts
  • WSU Pullman
  • Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Ariel Medeiros.
Medeiros

Ariel Medeiros

COMMUNITY SERVICE

  • College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Science, Psychology
  • WSU Pullman
  • Reno, Nevada

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Washington State University

Fine arts professor’s research wins NEH grant

Hallie G. Meredith.
Meredith

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced $24 million in grants for 225 humanities projects across the country, including work by Hallie Meredith, an assistant professor, career track, of fine arts at Washington State University.

Meredith’s project, “Fragmentary and Unfinished Art: Documenting Undocumented Late Roman Art and Process,” is the only project from the state of Washington selected for NEH funding. The $6,000 summer stipend will support her research and writing of a monograph about late Roman carving techniques through the study of incomplete stone sculptures.

“The implications for this project are wide-ranging, extending beyond the central period of study,” Meredith said. “I expect to make a significant interdisciplinary contribution to discourse in archaeology, ancient history, art history, classics, craft history and theory and economic studies, among other fields of study.”

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WSU Insider