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No Changes for King Richard III — for now

Do-gooder or scoundrel – in the wake of the early February announcement that the skeleton found beneath a parking lot in central England is that of King Richard III, how much does it matter? After all, he reigned for only two years and died more than a half-millennium ago at the age of 32.

There’s also the question of how much a long-buried skeleton can tell us about the person’s actions and behaviors back in the 15th century, said Jesse Spohnholz, associate professor of European history. “While the bones confirm that he suffered wounds in battle and also resolve the puzzle of where he was buried, they are silent when it comes to telling us how he reigned.”

Read more about the debate >>

WSU Professors Contribute to Middle School Instruction

With the help of a $1.7M federal Math and Science Partnership grant, WSU professors from several disciplines will provide instructional support for teachers in selected school districts over the next three years.

“The focus is on development of middle school math and science teachers’ content knowledge and on student-centered instruction through the use of ‘design challenges,’ which are integrated, project-based learning experiences,”  said David Slavit, professor of mathematics and education at WSUVancouver.

Materials developed through the partnership program will be available for all schools across the state.

Read more at WSU News >>

Workshop Demystifies Grant Application Process

Just what does it take to get a grant or fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities? The Office of Grant and Research Development (OGRD) and the College of Arts and Sciences will sponsor an NEH Grant Application Writing Workshop on March 21 to explain the process.

Workshop host, NEH program director Dr. John Cox, will present and answer questions about the grant process, with an emphasis on writing and application review. Participants will also learn about NEH programs and special initiatives. A representative from Humanities Washington will also take part in the daylong event.

The workshop will run from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m in CUE 518. Dr. Cox and the Humanities Washington representative will meet individually with WSU faculty and graduate students for pre-arranged appointments until 5:00 p.m and individual appointments will be available on March 22 from 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. as well.

Seating is limited and advanced registration is required.

Findings from senior thesis published in Appetite journal

“The problem is no longer food scarcity, but too much food,” said Halley Morrison, a recent WSU biology graduate and author of an interdisciplinary Honors College senior thesis that was published in the journal Appetite.

Morrison, together with Tom Power, professor and chair of the human development department, analyzed more than 200 mother-child surveys and found that a mother’s eating habits and behavior at the dinner table can influence her preschooler’s obesity risk.

Read more at WSU News and Appetite.

Anthropology Student to Direct V-Day Play

Randi Beardslee, a sophomore studying anthropology, will direct the 2013 benefit production of “The Vagina Monologues,” on Feb. 21-23 in the Jones Theater in Daggy Hall.

The award-winning play dives into the mystery, heartbreak, wisdom and outrage of women’s experiences with issues such as menstruation, rape, incest and battery. Based on interviews with more than 200 women, the end result has been described as “hilarious” and “empowering.”

“The show has many funny, light-hearted monologues,” said Randi Beardslee, WSU sophomore anthropology major and director of the production. “It brings women together to sympathize, empathize, mourn and, most importantly, celebrate.”

The show is sponsored by V-Day WSU, a registered student organization affiliated with Health and Wellness Services that raises awareness to end violence against women and girls. The production contributes to the average of $8,000 V-Day WSU raises each year. The majority of the proceeds are donated to Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse.

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