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Senior’s antibiotic resistance review earns Library Research Award

Miles RobertsHeadlines warning of the dangers of antibiotic resistance appear in the news almost every day. The United Nations predicts that by 2050, 10 million people could die each year from diseases that have become resistant to drugs.

Biology major Miles Roberts wanted to know how science is working to counter this trend. So, for his “Microbes in Nature and Society” class (Biology 402), he reviewed 65 scientific articles and turned his research into a paper called “Maximizing Costs to Prevent Antibiotic Resistance Evolution.” His thorough investigation resulted in » More …

$1.4M DoD grant supports new eDNA techniques

Caren Goldberg near an Idaho pond.Freshly drawn from an Idaho pond, the half-liter of water running through Caren Goldberg’s funnel-shaped filter carries trace cells and tiny fragments bearing DNA—genetic code from native frogs and salamanders.

Those few strands of code say a lot to Goldberg, a WSU scientist who studies environmental DNA, or eDNA—genetic material sampled from soil or water rather than directly from an organism. The samples not only identify the animals who live in this pond, they hold the potential to » More …

A big future in big data

Haylie MurrayHaylie Murray, a 21-year-old native of Camano Island, Wash., was named as the 2019 Outstanding Senior for the WSU data analytics program.

“There is a sense of accomplishment in being the part of the first graduating class in data analytics,” she said.

Data analysts and scientists are critical to industries on the cutting edge of technology. Data analytics students acquire skills to create, analyze, manage and explore incredibly complex data and communicate past and future trends to solve real-world problems. Graduates in the field are » More …

Medical Big Data

illustrationCurrently, there is a shortage of data wranglers and analysts. Just in time to meet the needs of what could be a revolution in healthcare, WSU is bringing up to speed one of the few data analytics programs in the country. Under the direction of entrepreneur-scientist Nella Ludlow, WSU’s new data analytics program is training the bioinformaticists who will be the genetic counselors and consultants of the future.

Just in its second year—paralleling the new WSU MD program in Spokane—Ludlow’s students are getting jobs as fast as they can get their degrees. She mentions a couple of juniors who got internships with a company that analyzes low-altitude aerial photography for » More …

Scientists seek causes, better predictions for South Asia’s changing monsoon

Deepti Singh, assistant professor in the School of the Environment, is trying to understand how and why the South Asian summer monsoon is changing.

Weather patterns in the region are becoming harder to predict, with rain falling in unusual amounts and locations, putting billions of lives and livelihoods at risk.

Working with colleagues in the U.S. and India, Singh has authored a new review exploring » More …

Musical duo appear again in opera production

For Mom’s Weekend, graduating seniors Clare Sullivan and Bogdan Theo Mynka shared the stage one last time as Anne and Fenton in Otto Nicolai’s opera, “The Merry Wives of Windsor.” Both will receive bachelor’s of music degrees in vocal performance in May.

During their time at WSU, they have played a variety of roles in the opera and musical theatre program.  Previously, they appeared together in “Young Frankenstein” with Sullivan as Inga and Theo Mynka as Igor, and they starred together again as Cinderella and Jack in Sondheim’s “Into the Woods.”

Last summer, both participated in vocal programs in Europe. Sullivan studied with » More …

Practical solutions to real crime issues

David MakinAfter leading police on a slippery, high-speed chase through snowy Spokane neighborhoods, running red lights and stop signs, driving through a resident’s yard, and slamming his stolen Subaru into a Jeep, a chronic car thief finally was caught, several minutes — and thousands of dollars in property damage — later.

Could anything have been done to prevent this crime spree?

A team of undergraduate researchers in David Makin’s Crime Prevention Strategies class would say yes, based on the in-depth study of vehicle theft prevention the students conducted » More …

English professor chronicles Arctic residency adventure

the AntiguaSailing aboard the Antigua, a traditionally rigged tall ship specially outfitted for sailing in the high Arctic,   writer and Regents professor of English Debbie Lee chronicled her experience as a member of the Arctic Circle Artist Residency Program.

One of thirty artists from every part of the world sailing the west coast of Svalbard toward the North Pole while working on individual and collaborative projects, Lee teamed up with a glass sculptor, » More …

Shaking hands with the past

Nathan OroscoFor artist Nathan Orosco (’02 MFA), the process of making art is an art in itself. From sculpting clays to melting bronze, “you’re collaborating with raw materials. You’re shaking hands with the past and the historic ways humans have traditionally dealt with those materials. And then I add in the content of my own personal identity.”

Cast bronze, fused glass, ceramics, textiles, wood, and other media take shape in Orosco’s art that speaks of his social, political, and » More …

Mentors make the difference

woman at microscope by WSU TriCities Demi Galindo, a master’s student at WSU Tri-Cities, recently received a call that would change the course of her life.

She had been accepted to medical school. Better yet, she had received a tuition waiver for her four years of medical education, with the exception of two semesters during her third and fourth years – an acceptance package that is incredibly rare. » More …