CAS News Arts and Sciences Headlines

Book to expose religious spies working for U.S. government in World War II

A new book, tentatively titled “(Un)Holy Spies: Religion and Espionage in World War II” by Washington State University (WSU) history professor Matthew Sutton, will uncover the role of religious figures and clergy in secret U.S. government operations during the time of President Franklin Roosevelt. It will be published in 2019.

Matthew Avery Sutton
Matthew A. Sutton

The book has been granted a $50,000 Public Scholar Program grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities, part of the $79 million the agency granted for 290 humanities projects and programmes in the U.S.

Sutton has discovered never-before-seen archival materials that detail a “secret army” whose activities “laid the foundation for the development of the CIA and continue to influence U.S. policy today,” he said. The NEH grant will allow him to continue “doing cutting-edge research and making it accessible to the broader public,” he said.

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Christian Today
WSU News

The Centrality of Dual Career for Recruiting Women

Dual-career programs have become widely seen as vital in faculty recruiting. To get one half of a faculty couple, a college needs to offer a good opportunity to the spouse, the theory goes. Colleges do this in a variety of ways, sometimes going so far as to authorize new lines in some departments so that both halves of a couple have a reason to move. But other institutions do relatively little to help.

Julie Kmec
Julie Kmec

Julie Kmec, a professor of sociology at Washington State University, and Hong Zhang, a doctoral student there, used survey data from faculty couples at seven universities to examine dual-career issues in academe. » More …

Through Sept. 17: Faculty art explores geometric tradition

A retrospective of works by Chris Watts, emeritus professor of fine arts at WSU, will run Aug. 22-Sept. 17 at the Museum of Art/WSU. An opening reception at 6 p.m. and artist talk at 7 p.m. will be Thursday, Aug. 25, in the museum gallery. Admission is free.

Chris Watts
Chris Watts

Citing influences as diverse as Bronze Age monuments, spirals and mazes, Pythagoras, counting processes, scientific structures, bell ringing, Theosophy and the geometric tradition in art, Watts pursues a long-term inquiry into systems of order, patterning and – to a certain degree – spiritual or esoteric ideas.

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WSU News

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do we feel pain?

Raymond Quock
Raymond Quock

Pain is unpleasant, but we need it for survival. Just the other day I was out exploring when I stubbed my paw and let out a big meow. My nervous system was doing its job.

Pain is actually the number one reason people see a doctor, said my friend Raymond Quock. He’s a scientist here at Washington State University who is really curious about pain.

“Pain in many aspects is good,” he said. “It’s a warning that your body is in danger.”

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Ask Dr. Universe

New WSU study: Even tired cops are more hesitant to shoot black suspects

The most explosive crisis law enforcement faces today is the allegation that rampant racial bias drives officers’ shooting decisions.

Bryan Vila
Bryan Vila

Yet a new study by Bryan Vila, professor of criminal justice and criminology, and two of his associates in the WSU Sleep and Performance research Center concludes that officers tend not to be biased against black suspects in resorting to deadly force, even when fatigued and thus potentially more vulnerable to making angry, irrational, and impulsive decisions.  » More …