CAS News Arts and Sciences Headlines

Planning begins for Tendoy Interpretive Park

For the fourth year, the Daylight Creek Gathering near Virginia City, Mont., welcomed the Shoshone-Bannock people back to their ancestral homelands. Coordinator Leo Ariwite said, “Being up here we can see everything. These are the same mountains that our ancestors saw.”

Orlan Svingen
Orlan Svingen

Ariwite has been collaborating with Washington State University Professor of History Orlan Svingen to gather historical evidence and documentation of areas inhabited by the tribal people before white settlement. Their research uncovered a land cession document signed in 1870 which allowed Chief Tendoy’s people a land claim that the U.S. government never honored. Since the finding, Svingen and Ariwite have been trying to bring the truth to light.

With cooperation from the townsfolk of Virginia City, last year Tendoy Park, an eight-acre area was dedicated to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes. This year proposed plans for a future Interpretive Park were presented by WSU students Alicia Woodard and Allison Bremmeyer, who were a part of a group of nine students who brainstormed ideas from the John and Janet Creighton Public History Field School. The discussion was meant as a public consultation with the tribal people and to gather their input.

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Sho-Ban News

Researchers ‘watch’ crystal structure change in real time

Yogendra Gupta
Yogendra Gupta

Washington State University researchers have met the long-standing scientific challenge of watching a material change its crystal structure in real time.

Their discovery is a dramatic proof of concept for a new way of discerning the makeups of various materials, from impacted meteors to body armor to iron in the center of the Earth.

Until now, researchers have had to rely on computer simulations to follow the atomic-level changes of a structural transformation under pressure, said Yogendra Gupta, Regents professor and director of the WSU Institute of Shock Physics. The new method provides a way to actually measure the physical changes and to see if the simulations are valid.

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WSU News

New radiochemistry training offered to WSU grad students

Nathalie Wall
Nathalie Wall

A new radiochemistry trainee program at Washington State University will help address a critical shortage of scientists in the nuclear energy industry.

Supported by a $3 million U.S. Department of Energy grant, the program will enhance training at WSU and let graduate students work alongside radiochemistry experts at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the next five years.

“Researchers and staff trained in America’s nuclear era in the late 20th century are retiring in large numbers and the current supply of trainees will not able to keep up with demand,” said Nathalie Wall, associate professor of chemistry and director of the WSU radiochemistry traineeship. “This program will provide our students with a variety of research experiences and a pipeline of potential employees well-educated in radiochemistry.”

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WSU News

Are Democratic lawmakers ‘jumping ship’ from Legislature?

Cornell Clayton
Cornell Clayton

Republicans might have followed Democrats to line up for statewide offices and Congress, too, if they had a shot at winning some of them, said Cornell Clayton, a political science professor at Washington State University.

Statewide elections already prove tough for Republicans to win… and divisive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump could increase statewide turnout even more than normal in Democrats’ favor, Clayton said.

“Republicans (in Washington) are going to be running in a headwind given who is running at the top of their ticket in the general election right now,” he said.

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$1.7M to counteract poor decision-making due to sleep loss

An interdisciplinary team of WSU researchers received a $1.7 million grant to develop and test cognitive flexibility training to combat the effects of sleep loss on decision-making under rapidly changing circumstances. Led by Hans Van Dongen, of the WSU Sleep and Performance Research Center, the team includes psychology researchers Paul Whitney and John Hinson.

John Hinson
John Hinson
Paul Whitney
Paul Whitney

The project aims to reduce decision-making errors that contribute to failed military missions, industrial accidents, workplace injuries, financial losses and other serious consequences.

Funding for the three-year project comes from the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, a partnership between the U.S. Congress, military and public to fund groundbreaking, high-impact medical research.

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WSU News