Skip to main content Skip to navigation
CAS News Arts and Sciences Headlines

Toxic Bullies: Striking Similarities Between Trump’s Arpaio Pardon And Polluters

If you are Latino and poor, chances are excellent that pollution is your neighbor, something known as environmental injustice.

According to a Washington State University sociological research report, barrios of economically disadvantaged Latino immigrants who do not speak English are more exposed to cancer-causing air toxics than any other community in the U.S.

“Hazardous air pollutants can cause cancer or other serious reproductive and birth defects. Most originate from automobiles and industrial sources like factories, refineries and power plants,” it adds.

Find out more

HuffPost

El Semanario

WSU alumna to appear on ‘America’s Got Talent’

Lareesa Marquette-Blakely, a ’15 WSU sociology alumna, will perform on “America’s got Talent,” 8 p.m. (Pacific Time) Tuesday, Aug. 29, on NBC.

WSU alum Lareesa Marquette-Blakey to participiate in “America's got-Talent” Tuesday, Aug. 29. Coug students and alumni encouraged to vote.

Blakely is part of the 43-member gospel choir Danell Daymon & Greater Works. The choir will participate as part of the live show quarterfinals. Winners who move on to the semifinals are determined by public vote.

While at WSU, Blakey was a member of the WSU Black Student Union and Black Women’s Caucus. During her sophomore year, she became the director of God’s Harmony, a faith-based WSU registered student organization and gospel choir that still performs regularly in the Pullman community.

“My goal was to encourage others to try their best and to build an organization that would last for years after I was gone,” she said.

Find out more

WSU News

Innovative WSU approach ignites survey industry, earns national award

WSU researchers will receive a national award for designing a new survey method that is now used in censuses around the world.

WSU Regents Professor Don Dillman and a team of former graduate students will receive the Warren J. Mitofsky Innovators Award from the American Association for Public Opinion Research. The last award was granted in 2015 to Nate Silver, creator of FiveThirtyEight , the statistics-based news site.

The WSU team’s innovation is overcoming the negative effects that modern communication trends have on public opinion survey results by turning to an old-school source: postal mail.

Find out more

WSU News

What’s powering your devices?

Christine Horne

Do Americans want to use more renewable energy?

Yes they do – regardless of whether they’re Democrats or Republicans, according to new research by Washington State University sociologists.

Christine Horne, professor of sociology, and Emily Kennedy, assistant professor of sociology, published a study in the journal Energy Policy that shows many Americans would prefer to power their homes with wind, solar and other forms of renewable energy if given the option.

Find out more

WSU News

NY Daily News

Bioenergy Insight Magazine

ScienceDaily

Science Newsline

Study: Environmental views can come from pulpits, not politicos

For some, the battle lines over environmental policy are drawn on religious—not necessarily political—grounds, suggests a new study by sociologists at the University of Nebraska and Washington State University.

The study in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion found that religious ideologies are driving opposition to environmental spending. More specifically, evangelical Protestants—usually perceived as the most conservative of Christians—are less likely to support environmental spending based on a literal interpretation of the Bible.

Johnson

The findings were culled from surveys collected from 1984 to 2012. Study co-author Erik Johnson, WSU associate professor of sociology, looked at three possible causes of evangelicals’ opposition to environmental spending: church attendance, political affiliation and biblical literalism. Only biblical literalism played a significant role across all three decades studied, and when comparing evangelicals to all other religious groups.

The findings may also explain why President Donald Trump felt core supporters would approve of his June 1 action to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Accord, despite its favorability to the general public. Evangelical Protestants, who largely supported Trump, tend to disagree.

Find out more

Nebraska Today

Beatrice Daily Sun

Religion News Service

Other sources:

America Magazine – click to view

Sight Magazine – click to view

The Northern Star – click to view

Noosa News – click to view

The Gazette – click to view