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WSU Arts and Sciences Alumni

2016 College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Senior Recognition Ceremony

We Put All Donations to Work

The support of alumni, friends, corporations and foundations are critical to the success of students and provides opportunity and resources for instruction, important research, creative activities, student well-being and countless other endeavors that make a real difference for Cougars everywhere.

Highlights of recent gifts include:

John and Janet Creighton Public History Project

A high-impact private grant connects the WSU Public History Program with ongoing historical and cultural interpretive work by government and Native American tribal groups in southwest Montana and east-central Idaho.

Entrepreneurial Innovation

A generous private gift by Bill and Mary Graber laid the foundation for an enterprising, collaborative, interactive, and creative program that equips students with cross-disciplinary skills and business experience. Now in its second year, the SKILD at WSU program provides students with opportunities to develop their leadership skills through entrepreneurial thinking and project planning.

Herbert Eastlick’s Legacy 

When Professor Herb Eastlick retired in 1973, a group of former students established the Eastlick Distinguished Professorship fund to support outstanding research scientists and professors and to keep Herb’s legacy active on campus. In 2004, generous gifts from the Eastlick estate established the undergraduate scholarship fund for students interested in heathcare careers. Continued contributions to these funds help provide critical support for dozens of future physicians, dentists, and veterinarians.

Sam Reed Distinguished Professorship in Civic Education and Public Civility

In honor of his lifetime commitment to encouraging young people to learn about and engage in the political process, the Sam Reed distinguished professorship at WSU will support research and teaching activities advancing civility, moderation and bipartisanship in the political arena.

 

 

Arctic expedition in 1963 benefits students today

In 2012, the Charles R. Conner Museum of Natural History received a highly unusual gift: a 10-foot-long polar bearskin rug.

“We never expected to be able to add a polar bearskin to our collection,” said Kelly Cassidy, curator for the museum, “Due to the arid conditions for the majority of its life, the rug is in good shape and is a valuable addition to the museum.”

A gift-in-kind from a friend of the University, the rare specimen made its WSU debut in Daniela Monk’s mammology class. During a lesson on bears and seals, the polar bearskin, a grizzly bearskin, and a brown bearskin were brought into the lab so students could see and touch the specimens as they compared the similarities and differences of these related mammals.