Skip to main content Skip to navigation
College of Arts and Sciences Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs

Top Ten Seniors for 2018

collage of six smiling facesSix of the 2018 WSU Top Ten Seniors received their bachelor’s degree in the College of Arts and Sciences:

Denzel McCray, psychology
Celena Hansen, music & anthropology
Garrett Kalt, political science
Alice Hiemstra, music
James Whitbred, mathematics
Shanelle Briggs, general studies sciences

For more than 80 years, Washington State University has recognized 10 of the top seniors in each graduating class: outstanding women and men who represent the highest standards in » More …

15 CAS students earn leadership, engagement awards

LEAD award title slideFifteen undergraduate students plus two faculty and one staff member from across the College of Arts and Sciences were recognized during the 2018 Leadership and Engagement Awards of Distinction ceremony on April 17.

Award recipients demonstrate exceptional leadership and service to the university and the community and support the leadership development and engagement of WSU students. Recipients were selected through a nomination process » More …

‘End of progress’ focus of philosophy talks

55th Potter Memorial LectureSocial progress is a complex and controversial concept in current philosophical and political debates—rejected because of its links to ideologies of colonialism and imperialism while also defended as important for achieving emancipatory social goals, said Matt Stichter, associate professor in the School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs. » More …

Philosophy major contributes to cognitive research

snowman in a hat with scarfGetting ready for school on a snowy day can be quite a challenge for young children. In addition to eating breakfast, getting dressed and packing up workbooks, they have to remember extra things like boots, gloves, a hat, and a coat.

Undergraduate researcher Jenna (Eva) Caneva helped turn this real-life scenario into a simple cognition exercise to test the ability of 6-to-10-year-olds to follow instructions. » More …

China Town Hall to focus on state, local impact

China Town Hall“The annual CHINA Town Hall aims to help people nationwide understand the challenges and opportunities of what has been characterized as the most important bilateral relationship of the twenty-first century,” said Lydia Gerber, clinical associate professor of history and director of the WSU Asia Program, the local event sponsor.

As the top U.S. state exporter to China, Washington has an enormous stake in U.S.-China relations. From wheat to apples and Microsoft to Boeing, businesses and industries statewide are directly affected by America’s political and economic strategy regarding China. » More …

Where the trouble began

book cover and author portrait image“Fiction is a document of trouble,” says novelist James Thayer ’71. The trouble began for Thayer as a teenager reading Bram Stoker’s Dracula on his father’s wheat farm in Almira.

“The narrator sees the Count leap to a window frame—and then crawl down the exterior of the castle wall like a lizard!” Thayer exclaims. “That scene scared me to death! It was a revelation as to the power of fiction.”

Now, decades later, the Seattle-based author of 14 novels teaches fiction writing through the University of Washington’s continuing education program. » More …

WSU leading implementation of online K-12 truancy prevention program

WARNS logoWashington State University is leading the online implementation of a program aimed at reducing school truancy that could positively impact schools across the state, and possibly the nation.

Paul Strand, WSU Tri-Cities professor of psychology; Nick Lovrich, WSU Regents professor emeritus; Brian French, professor and director of WSU’s Learning and Performance Research Center and Psychometric Laboratory; and Bruce Austin, research associate in educational psychology and the LPRC, evaluated and refined the Washington Assessment of the Risks and Needs of Students program. WARNS uses data-driven procedures to track and improve interventions with students. » More …

Top Ten Senior Awards

Five of this year’s Top Ten Seniors are receiving a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. A sixth is receiving two CAS minors.

For more than 80 years, Washington State University has recognized 10 of the top seniors in each graduating class. These five women and five men represent the Pullman campus’ highest standards in specific aspects of the college experience, including academics, athletics, campus involvement, community service, and visual and performing arts.

Read about all ten students on the WSU.edu homepage >>

Gonfalon honor goes to political science, history double major

Student with CAS deanCasey McNicholas, a U.S. Army officer and senior in political science and history (pictured, left, with Daryll DeWald, CAS dean), has been selected to carry the College of Arts and Sciences gonfalon during Saturday’s commencement ceremony in Beasley Coliseum.

Gonfalons are the shield-shaped banners that represent WSU’s 11 colleges during the commencement ceremony. Being selected as a college’s gonfalon bearer is a prestigious recognition given to a graduate with a record of outstanding achievement.

McNicholas, a 4.0 student with a minor in military science in addition to his double major, » More …

Trump presidency focus of politics series in February

WSU campus in the snowDonald Trump’s presidency will be discussed by experts in U.S. politics during a series of free, public events at Washington State University Wednesday, Feb. 1, and Monday, Feb. 6. Topics will include America’s changing electoral landscape, conspiracy theories, the media and race politics.

The series is hosted by WSU’s nonpartisan Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service, which focuses on bringing world-class speakers to public events, supporting student internships in public service and promoting scholarly research on public policy and political institutions. » More …

Washington State University