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College of Arts and Sciences Faculty

$1.2M NSF grant to support new generation of female leaders

Maria Gartstein.Maria Gartstein found herself in an unfamiliar position when she reached the level of associate professor in 2008.

“I was unsure of what to do next,” Gartstein said. “I always had a pretty good sense of what it would take to get tenure but once I got it I realized I hadn’t really thought beyond that.”

Gartstein’s dilemma was and still is a common occurrence in academia.  Research shows » More …

French Film Festival brings cultural diversity

Sabine Davis.For the tenth year in a row, the Palouse French Film Festival offered students and local community members the opportunity to experience a slice of European culture.

“Some of our films get more toward the history of France, some are more modern and [delve into] culture or today’s French society,” said Sabine Davis, clinical professor of French and co-organizer of the festival. » More …

Exploring ‘internet addiction’ with paintings

Artwork by Joe Hedges.Among fine arts faculty member Joe Hedges‘s latest artworks are oil paintings of beautiful landscapes with a twist. They incorporate flat screen televisions, smart phones, or other objects to become what he calls “Hypercombines”—paintings that are connected to the internet.

“I started thinking about this buzz phrase that was going around a few years ago, ‘the internet of things,’ and asking myself why couldn’t an oil painting be part of the internet of things? What would that look like?” he asked. » More …

Summer scholars connect research to the real world

Student Jeannette Lilly (center) works with graduate student Erica Bakker (left) and Sarah Roley, assistant professor of environmental science, in an environmental science lab as part of her Chancellor’s Summer Scholars experience.This past summer, ten WSU Tri-Cities undergraduate students in the Chancellor’s Summer Scholar Program got to experience first-hand how top-tier university research can impact their local community.

“Students pursuing a bachelor’s degree get the opportunity to be a part of intensive research that could positively influence the Tri-Cities community,” said Kate McAteer, WSUTC vice chancellor for academic affairs. “Ranging from engineering, to the arts, to the sciences, there are a variety » More …

Dr. Universe: Why do people like different kinds of music?

Dr. UniverseHumans have been experimenting with all kinds of sounds, lyrics, and instruments for thousands of years. There are hundreds of genres of music, so while you might like one kind, a friend might like something completely different. Or maybe you became friends because of your similar taste in music.

My friend Horace Alexander Young is a WSU musician and professor. When I went to visit him, » More …

New Boeing Distinguished Professor named

Dylan Bugden.An expert in environmental conflict and the sociology of energy systems, Dylan Bugden has been named as the Boeing Distinguished Professor in Environmental Sociology.

Bugden is an enthusiastic educator and researcher who examines environmental electoral politics, social movements, and land-use conflicts with » More …

WSU tuba professor releases third solo album

Chris Dickey holding a tubaWSU tuba professor Chris Dickey recently released his third solo album, titled “Inventions,” under the Emeritus Recordings label. The album was recorded in the WSU Recording Studio by recording engineer David Bjur. Karen Savage, Sarah Miller, and Martin King joined Dickey for the project.

“Inventions” represents Dickey’s ongoing commitment to inclusive programming in art music. The album demonstrates » More …

Interdisciplinary research to save amphibians worldwide

small frog sits on a person's fingerA diverse group of WSU scientists share a common, critial goal: to prevent the occurrence of a second fungal pandemic—an explosive threat looming just over the horizon.

Their collective efforts have put WSU in the national spotlight as an emerging center for amphibian research. » More …

Study finds minimal effect on major crime from legal marijuana sales

Plastic bag containing marijuana.Legalizing recreational marijuana has had minimal effect on violent or property crime rates in Washington and Colorado, a WSU study funded by the National Institute of Justice has found.

“As the nationwide debate about legalization, the federal classification of cannabis under the Controlled Substances Act, and the consequences of legalization for crime continues, it is essential to center that discussion on studies that use contextualized and robust research designs » More …

Studio of notes

David Bjur at the recording studio desk.The first thing you might notice about the Washington State University recording studio is the silence. It starts when Dave Bjur, studio manager and chief engineer, closes the hallway door, sealing off the random din of the Kimbrough Music Building’s top floor. Then he closes a second door and a weird sensation settles into the ears that, when you think about it, is rare in the modern world.

It’s an anti-sound, the audio version of true black, » More …