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College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Opioids kill minorities at younger ages

AlthoughOutline of the state of Washington filled with the image of an ambulance and opioids in the background. opioid use cuts across socio-economic boundaries, WSU researchers have found racial and ethnic minorities in Washington state are more likely to die from an overdose earlier in their lives than non-Hispanic white residents.

“This work confirms the epidemic is far reaching and having dramatic impacts on quality and length of life for Americans of all » More …

Math undergrads meet to solve real-world problems

Presenters discuss their research with conference visitors. How human and animal diseases spread, how trees move in wind, and how confined fluids flow are among topics of research conducted by undergraduate mathematicians from across the Pacific Northwest who met recently at Washington State University to discuss their work.

Students and faculty from six universities in Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington joined dozens of WSU peers at the » More …

Birds look for social cues, too

Two pine sisken birds.Birds of a feather not only flock together but also appear to settle down together.

“The presence of another bird that isn’t migratory seems to be a really potent cue to stop migration,” said Heather Watts, a Washington State University behavioral ecologist and corresponding author on a study recently published in Biology Letters. “We saw changes in their behavior and changes in their » More …

Jazz Big Band wins magazine award

Zoom screen shot of WSU Jazz Big Band.Throughout the pandemic, the WSU Jazz Big Band stayed focused on their craft, leveraging Zoom and other technologies to practice, perform, and record music together while physically distanced.

This spring, DownBeat magazine awarded the band its 2022 Graduate College Large Jazz Ensemble Award, recognizing the quality of the band’s asynchronous » More …

Community and equity training

Elson S. Floyd Cultural Center.The Community and Equity Certificate Program is helping faculty and staff across the WSU system expand their understanding of equity-mindedness and build a toolkit for engaging more effectively with students, colleagues, and community partners.

Kara Whitman, assistant professor in the School of the Environment, likened the workshop breakout discussions to a faculty learning community where » More …

Making a splash

Matt and Jennifer Ellison pose with Matt’s parents.Never underestimate the power of an elective, advises  Matt Ellison (’92 business) and GurglePot founder. “It gets people out of their comfort zone,” he says. “That’s the beauty of going to college and broadening your knowledge. At some point in life that random class could become the most important one you ever took.”

For him, it was introductory sculpture. » More …

Preserving the “Land of Origins”

Stone monoliths.Scattered across southern Ethiopia are thousands of mysterious stone monoliths rising as high as 20 feet.

“We don’t know who built the stelae in southern Ethiopia or why,” says Addisalem Melesse, a WSU doctoral student in archaeology. “However, the research we are doing at WSU is starting to shed light on the monument’s history and the people who built them.” » More …

Predicting age, gender based on temperment

A smiling infant laying face down on a blanket.A team of researchers led by Maria Gartstein, professor of psychology, developed a novel research study using machine learning to attempt to classify infants by gender and age.

“It was a cool opportunity to do kind of a demonstration study using techniques that require really large data sets and are not very common in social emotional development research,” Gartstein said. “It gave us the opportunity for » More …

Book review: Breaking the Mold

Book cover: Breaking the Mold, by Blanca Blanco.When she was nine and newly arrived in Washington state, Blanca Blanco (’03 psychology) performed scenes with her sisters in the garage in which they lived. Putting on these “homemade plays,” the self-made starlet writes in her new memoir, “was a way to escape our current life.” Acting, she notes, “gave me a sense of strength.” » More …