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College of Arts and Sciences Alumni

Vancouver Notable Alumni Award

Morgan Parker With remarkable energy, drive and a passion for community service, Morgan Parker (’12, ’14)  is devoting her life to help young adults who are struggling find their paths in life, and in doing so, she is making the community a better place for everyone.

She is the director of Next, a program » More …

Young alumna honored for legal services work

Brenda Rodriguez with awardees.WSU graduate Brenda Rodriguez (’18 Spanish), the eastern Washington network coordinator for the Washington Immigrant Solidarity Network (WAISN),  received the 2019 Visionary of the Year award from  Columbia Legal Services. Rodriguez, along with her WAISN colleague Monserrat Padilla, was honored on Oct. 16 at the Imagine Justice fundraiser.

The legal service honors leaders each year for their impact and commitment to racial equality, and for having inspiring and transformative » More …

Alumna pursues passion for design

Dana Dollarhyde - WSU Tri-Cities digital technology and culture alumna.Life preparation. It was the thing that most drove Dana Dollarhyde to get a college degree and the thing that she said she is most grateful for her college experience.

One reason Dollarhyde (’18 DTC) chose WSU Tri-Cities was because it was affordable: she received thousands in scholarships and also qualified for the College Bound Program which would paid her tuition in full. But it was WSU Tri-Cities staff and faculty that helped her find her passion and a career pathway » More …

Study finds minimal effect on major crime from legal marijuana sales

Plastic bag containing marijuana.Legalizing recreational marijuana has had minimal effect on violent or property crime rates in Washington and Colorado, a WSU study funded by the National Institute of Justice has found.

“As the nationwide debate about legalization, the federal classification of cannabis under the Controlled Substances Act, and the consequences of legalization for crime continues, it is essential to center that discussion on studies that use contextualized and robust research designs » More …

Casting an artful brush

Ben Miller fly fishing.The idea came to him during a phone call. The artist and avid fly fisherman was talking with his brother when he suddenly wondered whether it would be possible to combine his two loves in a way he hadn’t seen before. Could he use the same tool to catch fish as well as make art illustrating their natural habitat? Could he paint the rivers he loves to fish with a fly rod instead of a brush?

“A good fly fisherman is going to be really precise with » More …

With justice for all

Matt DeGarmo with students at a mock crime scene.Why do people commit crimes? There are a lot of theories, says Matt DeGarmo (’14 PhD criminal justice). Reasons range from needing to steal for simple survival to performing a cost-benefit analysis and deciding that crime does indeed pay.

When DeGarmo came to WSU to work on his doctorate, he says, “I was doing a lot of theory building,” trying to organize all the various theories of why people » More …

Saving sage-grouse by relocation

A grouse flying across the landscape with Mt. Rainier in the background.Moving can be tough, but eventually most of us acclimate to new surroundings. That’s true for humans, and research from Washington State University shows it’s the same for sage-grouse too.

A team of scientists successfully moved sage-grouse, a threatened bird species in Washington state, from one area of » More …

Catching up with Cesar

Cesar GuerreroCesar Guerrero graduated in May 2018 as the Digital Technology and Culture (DTC) Outstanding Senior and is now working in Reston, Virginia, as a associate consultant for Oracle, a computer technology corporation that specializes in cloud engineered systems, enterprise software products, and database software and technology.

Cesar helps to implement the company’s customer relationship management and service cloud base systems.  He helps customers by planning, designing, and presenting solutions to their issues. » More …

A point of reference

A waterway at Meyer's Point“There are oysters out there,” says Ed Bassett, “and they are good.”

Out there are the mudflats of Henderson Inlet where a thriving community shellfish garden supplies delicacies for neighborhood parties and celebrations. Bassett (’89 Ed.) is standing in the eelgrass on the shoreline of WSU’s Meyer’s Point Environmental Field Station. He’s a science teacher at nearby Olympia High School (OHS), and he, his students in the OHS Earth Corps, and Meyer’s Point facilities manager Chuck Cody (’84 MS Hort.) have been planting native trees here since » More …

Book review: Baseball in a Grain of Sand

A baseball player holding a bat casts a shadow across the orange gravel of the playfield.Baseball, writes Bill Gruber (’79 PhD English), evokes a literary state of mind. Now an English professor at Emory University, he explains that the suspense, narrative, soaring victories, and crushing tragedies of stories also appear in baseball, perhaps more than any other sport.

In Baseball in a Grain of Sand, Gruber explores baseball history and drama through one summer season of an American Legion team in Moscow, Idaho, the Blue Devils. Along the way, he meets and introduces fascinating people, many of whom share Gruber’s unabashed sentimentality for the sport. » More …