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Radio program connects NW past to present

Keren Phoenix and Brenna Miller.A Spokane resident whose invention transformed the shipping industry;  a woman who passed as a man and worked as a bartender, bronco buster, and longshoreman; plus preachers, prisoners, ranchers, immigrants, cowgirls, and soldiers are among the myriad people whose stories illuminate the history of the Northwest in Past as Prologue, a new radio program created by WSU historians Karen Phoenix and Brenna Miller. » More …

Royal Historical Society honors for Hatter

Lawrence Hatter.Associate professor of history Lawrence B.A. Hatter is among 99 people from across the globe recently elected a Fellow of the prestigious Royal Historical Society (RHS).

The 153-year-old organization based in the U.K. recognized Hatter for his “contribution to the discipline of history.” » More …

Outstanding seniors excel in academics, leadership, service

Sean Swalling, Samantha King-Shaw, andMegan Wong.Writers, researchers, scientists, musicians, athletes, activists, adventurers… the 23 students who received this year’s Outstanding Senior honors from the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) excelled in academic performance and in service to their department or school and to the broader Washington State University community.

Among those honored for 2021 are Regents scholars, National Merit scholars, transfer students, and » More …

Secret investigation of radioactive fallout is focus of historian’s research

Nuclear bomb blast.After years of polluting Earth’s atmosphere and ecosystems with nuclear material from atomic bomb tests, the U.S. government in 1953 launched “Project Sunshine,” a secret, international program to study the amount of radioactive fallout in the environment. The cheery-sounding program sought particularly to understand the impact of strontium 90, an unstable, radioactive version of a naturally occurring element which threatened to riddle people and animals with cancer. » More …

Dr. Universe: If snakes smell with their tongues, what do they do with their noses?

Dr. Universe: a cat in a lab coatSnakes have an amazing sense of smell. They can use their tongues to pick up on all kinds of scents in the air.

Whenever we smell something in the air, we are actually sniffing tiny building blocks called molecules. These molecules are what make up the scents of everything around us—things like baked bread, fresh-cut grass, and warm cookies. » More …

Students pen original songs of protest, social commentary

Jacob Wade, Letícia Monteiro, America Hoxeng, and Gabe Condon.From the morality of science and the banality of pandemic lockdown to struggles with money, police, queerness, and being the only girl in the band—the diverse topics of songs composed by students in Gabe Condon’s Songwriting II course reflect a wide range of social concerns and music created to address them.

For their capstone project, the 11 emerging songwriters composed songs focused on topics of protest and social commentary, one of several thematic areas they studied during the semester. » More …

Fine arts professor’s research wins NEH grant support

Glass sculpture.The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced $24 million in grants for 225 humanities projects across the country, including work by Hallie Meredith, a career-track assistant professor of fine arts at Washington State University.

Meredith’s project, “Fragmentary and Unfinished Art: Documenting Undocumented Late Roman Art and Process,” is the only project » More …

A quest to improve science communication, funding

Milica Radanovic.In addition to winning first place in her division for a compelling, three-minute overview of her complex, years-long biological research project, Milica Radanovic won a place among 23 graduate students selected nationwide by the Ecological Society of America (ESA) to inform Congress about the importance of funding scientific research.

“We are living during a time of global change and scientists have a social responsibility to » More …

Criminologist internationally honored for her work

The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) has selected Faith Lutze, a WSU professor and expert in criminal justice, to receive the group’s prestigious Founder’s Award in recognition of “a career of providing substantial contributions to the Academy and to the discipline of criminal justice through education and research.”

A member of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology faculty since 1995, Lutze regularly enters prison facilities to work with staff and inmates and provides essential research and » More …

Fine arts professor wins two national awards

Hallie MeredithHallie Meredith, a teaching assistant professor of fine arts, is being honored with two major awards for her research into ancient Roman art processes.

“The Roman period is crucial as a point of comparison with contemporary craft because art and craft were understood as coequal,” Meredith said. “My complementary areas of research in late Roman carving and contemporary craft enable me to strengthen our understanding of » More …