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Creative Vancougs

photo of clouds in a valley by T.RiordanThe Salmon Creek Journal’s Annual Photo Competition, Travel Cafe, features the Vancouver campus community’s best shots from around the world. Submissions for this year’s theme of “Bliss” included images of beautiful landscapes, interesting uses of light and reflection, as well as the joy of human interaction. » More …

Scholarship impact: Vancouver’s “Wonder Woman”

Natalie EwingIf “life experience” were an academic program, Natalie Ewing, a social science and digital technology and culture double major, would already have her master’s degree.

Like many other nontraditional students, Ewing encountered her share of detours and unexpected turns along the path to college. Raised in California, she grew up amid drugs, alcohol, physical and emotional abuse, caring for her younger brother, unstable mother and alcoholic stepfather.

“Growing up, I always loved school, and I wanted to go to class more than anything in the world,” she said. » More …

Daffin wins 2018 Excellence in Online Teaching Award

Lee DaffinLee Daffin, clinical associate professor of psychology, is the winner of the 2017-2018 WSU Excellence in Online Teaching Award.

Kelly Dunn, a senior majoring in psychology was one of six students to nominate Daffin, stating in her nomination, “Dr. Daffin has inspired me to pursue my interests and through that I was able to pick a program for grad school that I had been struggling with for two years. I can’t think of a professor who deserves this more than he does.” » More …

Psychology senior chosen as 2018 WSU Student Employee of the Year

 Jackie BaltazarClerical assistant Jackie Baltazar’s presence in the WSU Dept. of Criminal Justice and Criminology provides a friendly atmosphere to visiting students, and staff rely on her as a trusted employee who strives to help everyone who comes through her door.

“I really like this job,” said Baltazar, a two-year employee and senior psychology major from Los Angeles. “It doesn’t feel like a job because I want to be here.”’ » More …

Coho salmon die, chum salmon survive in stormwater runoff

Coho SalmonWSU scientists have discovered that different species of salmon have varying reactions to polluted stormwater runoff.

In a recent paper published in the journal Environmental Pollution, scientists found that coho salmon became sick and nearly died, within just a few hours of exposure to polluted stormwater. But chum salmon showed no signs of ill-effects after prolonged exposure to the same water.

“It really surprised us,” said Jen McIntyre, an assistant professor in WSU’s School of the Environment. “Not that the coho were » More …

NEH grant to create national humanities education model at WSU

NEH Announces Next Generation Humanities PhD Grant RecipientsA new National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant catalyzes a year of discussion and planning at Washington State University aimed at creating a national model for connecting graduate education in the humanities to rural and underserved populations.

Funded by the NEH’s NextGen Ph.D. program, the grant will bring together more than 20 faculty, staff, graduate students, and recent graduate alumni from across WSU to consider how graduate education in the humanities can better support the university’s land-grant mission of improving access, inclusivity, and » More …

Assessing how cannabis affects emotional well-being

Marijuana in a prescription bottle In a first-of-its-kind study, Washington State University scientists examined how peoples’ self-reported levels of stress, anxiety and depression were affected by smoking different strains and quantities of cannabis at home.

Their work, published this month in the Journal of Affective Disorders, suggests smoking cannabis can significantly reduce short-term levels of depression, anxiety, and stress but may contribute to worse overall feelings of depression over time.

It marks one of the first attempts by U.S. scientists to assess » More …

Director named for Meyer’s Point Environmental Field Station

Steve BollensStephen Bollens, professor of aquatic ecology at WSU Vancouver, has been named director of the newly designated Meyer’s Point Environmental Field Station.

Located just north of Olympia in a rapidly urbanizing area, Meyer’s Point is a 95-acre parcel of undeveloped land with 2,100 feet of Puget Sound shoreline and extensive terrestrial, wetland and aquatic habitats. The property was bequeathed to WSU in 1990 by Edward R. Meyer to be used to promote environmental education, research and the arts. » More …

Analyzing fish skull development and evolutionary success

Jim Coopere holding a fish tankA biology researcher at WSU Tri-Cities aims to pinpoint underpinnings of evolutionary success by analyzing the skull morphology of a handful of fish species.

“One-third of living vertebrates belong to two fish lineages that independently evolved the ability to project their upper jaws forward from the face during feeding,” said Jim Cooper, assistant professor of biological sciences. “This jaw protrusion has been massively important to » More …

WSU, PNNL strengthen nuclear science research, education ties

Embracing the ‘power of partnerships,’ the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Washington State University announced the formation of the WSU-PNNL Institutes — a collection of three joint institutes that will advance science and technology in nuclear science and technology, advanced grid and bioproducts.

In a ceremony on April 3 at WSU Tri-Cities, located in Richland near PNNL’s research campus, institute leaders noted that these areas are critical for the nation and Northwest and solutions to major challenges are possible with these two institutions coming together. » More …

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