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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate

Fine arts education flourishes in face of pandemic

Four people sit on a couch with their faces lit up but obstructed by the digital devices they're holding in front of them., photograph, Samantha Wiltermood.From moist, cool clay to wet, drippy paint and dry, smudgy charcoal, visual art is a distinctly hands-on, sometimes messy, field of practice and study. So, what happens when art education goes online?

“Remote teaching certainly hasn’t slowed us down. In fact, these strange times have helped us reimagine new, more expanded ways to reach out to our students while still having deep and meaningful experiences in » More …

Making music, defying limitations

Joel Roeber.Almost nothing went as planned for senior Joel Roeber going into this semester, but that hasn’t stopped him from working toward earning his degree.

Roeber, who will receive his Bachelor of Music in Music Education next semester, recently completed his senior recital in a non-traditional way because of limitations caused by the pandemic. The senior recital is pivotal to music students’ progress and ability to » More …

Student, faculty serve on artist jury

Artwork by Troy Riley Miles, I am human.Mikayla Makle, an English major and president of the WSU Black Student Union—and a College of Arts and Sciences student ambassador—served alongside three CAS faculty to help select recipients of the recent Black Lives Matter Artist Grant program offered by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. » More …

Senior researcher honored at multicultural STEM conference

Jenna Pederson, a general studies in biological sciences major from Silverdale, Wash., received an award for her undergraduate research presentation at the annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), which were held virtually in November.

Mentored by WSU psychology professor Rebecca Craft, Pederson’s research project on modeling the severity of human pain was recognized in the physiology and pharmacology category, which » More …

Wine and fungi: The perfect pairing?

Students on Tanya Cheeke's research team plant wine grape plants for their fungi experiment at WSU Tri-Cities.A team at WSU Tri-Cities is researching the impact that a type of fungus could have on vineyard growth and associated nutrient uptake, which could lead to less watering and less fertilizer required for a successful grape crop.

Tanya Cheeke, assistant professor of biology, was awarded a two-year $40,000 grant to support a field experiment from the BIOAg program of » More …

Data analytics games provide education, professional opportunities, fun

Mathew Jockers at his computer.Working to build community among students learning remotely this fall, expert problem solvers in the WSU data analytics (DA) program created course-related games to stimulate interaction while providing some educational fun and valuable professional networking opportunities.

In collaboration with academic advisors for the WSU Pullman, Everett, Vancouver, and Global campuses, the program director and statistics professor Nairanjana “Jan” Dasgupta brought together students from across » More …

The power of symbiosis

Stephanie Porter.“Understanding the complex and often positive role the microbiome plays in the health of plants and animals has precipitated a real renaissance in biology,” says microbiologist Stephanie Porter, who studies the evolution of cooperation and plant–microbe symbiosis. “There’s been a blossoming of ideas due to new genomic tools for understanding this microbiome—the set of all microbes that live in and on plants and animals.”

“But there’s also been a shift in our thinking about microbes. We’ve moved from microbes being viewed strictly as the cause of diseases or that they are at best harmless, to thinking they have » More …

How to be a poet

Illustration of a student working at a desk.Poetry is art: uniting words with “a form to hold anything you want to say.”

“[We all] have a unique way of seeing the work and being in it. I’m intrigued by how different our perceptions are,” said Cameron McGill, teaching assistant professor in the Department of English and assistant editor for the online journal Blood Orange Review.

McGill had been a full-time musician when he began writing poetry in the early 2000s. His passion for the genre grew and, at the age of 39, he decided » More …

Cougs who serve

Troy Moya.The world-wide reach of WSU’s Global Campus has given rise to a unique community of students who are actively serving in the United States military. The convenience and flexibility of asynchronous learning is an ideal option for active duty soldiers and sailors who live and work in locations around the globe.

“Earning my degree was essential for increasing my analytical capabilities,” said Troy Moya, an enlisted Air Force imagery intelligence analyst and a recent WSU psychology graduate. “It has helped me to express my thoughts in an informed way that » More …

Student-produced video celebrates Veterans Day

The WSU Veterans Memorial on the Pullman campus.With the usual in-person gatherings unable to take place this year, faculty, staff, and students across the WSU system celebrated Veterans Day a little differently. Student-veteran Chris Mann produced a special video to share the traditional wreath placement at the WSU Pullman Veterans Memorial and to honor and thank veterans throughout the WSU community.

Mann, a senior majoring in psychology and criminal justice who spent eight years on active duty in the Marines fighting in both Iraq and Afghanistan, is president of the » More …