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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Faculty veterans lead training

Cougar Veterans, Washington State University.On WSU’s Pullman campus, two English department faculty members, who happen to be veterans themselves, are building awareness and understanding of a unique student population through their Student Veterans Awareness.

“Veterans, military members, and their families are a vital and vibrant part of the WSU Cougar community,” said Mike Edwards, an assistant professor of English. “We want these students to know » More …

NEH essay sheds light on 1921 Tulsa Massacre

The heart of the prosperous African-American district of Greenwood after the massacre. National Archives.Shock, horror, shame, disgust, sadness, inspiration, appreciation…

Thabiti Lewis’ essay on the 1921 Tulsa Massacre elicits a gamut of emotions throughout its 3,500 gripping words. The WSU Vancouver professor of English and associate vice chancellor for academic affairs co-authored the piece on an overlooked series of historic tragedies that he hopes can help spur change 100 years later. » More …

The power of poetry to advance social change

i know i'll be the one.When America’s first youth poet laureate, Amanda Gorman, presents another of her original poems during Super Bowl LV events on Sunday, WSU campus civic poet Allyson Pang will be among the millions of people cheering her on.

Like Gorman, Pang wants to use her education and creative writing skills to make the world a better place.

“In my poetry, I always want to inspire and » More …

Student, faculty serve on artist jury

Artwork by Troy Riley Miles, I am human.Mikayla Makle, an English major and president of the WSU Black Student Union—and a College of Arts and Sciences student ambassador—served alongside three CAS faculty to help select recipients of the recent Black Lives Matter Artist Grant program offered by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. » More …

How to be a poet

Illustration of a student working at a desk.Poetry is art: uniting words with “a form to hold anything you want to say.”

“[We all] have a unique way of seeing the work and being in it. I’m intrigued by how different our perceptions are,” said Cameron McGill, teaching assistant professor in the Department of English and assistant editor for the online journal Blood Orange Review.

McGill had been a full-time musician when he began writing poetry in the early 2000s. His passion for the genre grew and, at the age of 39, he decided » More …

A writer in chief

 Bill Gardner.Bill Gardner grew up on Pullman’s College Hill and thought for sure he was on track to be a teacher when he graduated from WSU. His father was a soil physicist at the University from 1950 to 1983. “I was 11 before I realized there were professions other than being a professor,” he says. “If I stood out at the end of my driveway, every house I saw had a professor living there.”

Gardner (’88, ’01 MA English), chief of Washington State University Police (and a published author), got into police work almost on a whim. He drove to the campus station with a friend who wanted to apply and decided » More …

The art and craft of historical narrative

Buddy Levy in the field.Buddy Levy, a longtime clinical professor in English, likes to make the trip.

He specializes in historical narrative, paying meticulous attention to detail, writing cinematically, and traveling to the sites of the stories he’s researching—sometimes several hundred years after they’ve occurred. Travel, he says, is necessary for scene-setting and description, and can be more meaningful than archival research.

His seventh book, Labyrinth of Ice, started with a visit to Greenland in 2003. But he was there to write about something else. Levy was covering a race in which » More …

Fellowships expand options for PhD students

A group gathered around a table. Living in Pullman while working on her graduate degree, Tabitha Espina yearned for the people, and the lumpia and adobo, that she grew up with in Guam. That all changed when she joined the first cohort of WSU’s grant-funded project, “Reimagining the 21st Century Land-Grant PhD” and began working with a community of Filipino and Pacific Islanders in Wapato, Wash. on a case study in public engagement.

“From this very small project—basically me wanting to find Filipino community close by and finally have Filipino food again—came the opportunity to talk about the humanities landscape more broadly, from a state level and eventually a national » More …