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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences shock physics

Researchers create, measure hexagonal diamonds

Diamonds.For the first time, researchers have hard evidence that human-made hexagonal diamonds are stiffer than the common cubic diamonds found in nature and often used in jewelry.

Named for their six-sided crystal structure, hexagonal diamonds have been found at some meteorite impact sites, and others have been made briefly in labs, but these were either too small or had too short of an existence to be measured. » More …

Alumnus recognized for superconductor advancements

Ranga Dias.A breakthrough in superconductivity has landed a WSU physics graduate in the latest Time Magazine list of top innovators.

Ranga Dias (’13 PhD) has been named one of 19 innovation leaders in the 2021 Time100 Next list, which highlights emerging leaders shaping the future. His work to develop a room temperature superconductor represents a significant advancement in the field, with wide-ranging applications from transportation to medical imaging, and even hover boards. » More …

Chemists develop novel dye for bio-imaging

Ming Xian and his labmatesWashington State University scientists have created an injectable dye that illuminates molecules with near-infrared light, making it easier to see what is going on deep inside the body.

The new dye will help medical researchers track the progression of a wide array of diseases, such as cancer.

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