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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences fish research

Toxin-adapted fish pass down epigenetic mutations

Two sliver fish on a white background, top fish is larger with orange highlights on its fins, bottom fish is smaller with some blue tones.You can take a fish out of toxic water, but its epigenetic mutations will remain for at least two generations.

A research team led by Washington State University scientists analyzed the epigenetics—molecular factors and processes that determine whether genes are turned on or off—of a group of Poecilia mexicana fish, or Atlantic molly, that live in springs naturally high in hydrogen sulfide, which is normally toxic to most organisms. » More …

WSU researchers find wealth of fish at deep Hawaiian reef

dozens of fish around coral reefWashington State University marine biologists for the first time have documented a wealth of fish in the “vastly underexplored” deep coral reefs off Hawaii Island.

The study gives fishery managers a more complete picture of fish species and habitat around the Big Island, home to a thriving aquarium fish trade, as well as other deep waters around the globe, said Cori Kane, a doctoral student at WSU Vancouver.

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