Skip to main content Skip to navigation
College of Arts and Sciences Alumni

Book review: Baseball in a Grain of Sand

A baseball player holding a bat casts a shadow across the orange gravel of the playfield.Baseball, writes Bill Gruber (’79 PhD English), evokes a literary state of mind. Now an English professor at Emory University, he explains that the suspense, narrative, soaring victories, and crushing tragedies of stories also appear in baseball, perhaps more than any other sport.

In Baseball in a Grain of Sand, Gruber explores baseball history and drama through one summer season of an American Legion team in Moscow, Idaho, the Blue Devils. Along the way, he meets and introduces fascinating people, many of whom share Gruber’s unabashed sentimentality for the sport. » More …

Olympos to Olympia

The director of the Office of Chief Information Officer for the State of Washington, who studied history at WSU, has a reminder for everyone who works in technology: “If you don’t understand history, you’re bound to repeat it.”

Sue Langen ’78 may work on the fifth floor of a huge office building in downtown Olympia, but she’s completely down to earth. Making technology work for the people of the state, she says, is a matter of both pride and ethical responsibility. » More …

Making the difference

“The fact that I’m a teacher now is just the greatest turn of events—my old high school teachers would be shocked,” says Kerry Clark (’11 Hum., ’14 MA English). He’s sharing his improbable story as we tour Saint George’s School, a private K–12 preparatory institute nestled in the woods along the Little Spokane River.

Clark teaches English and history classes for the International Baccalaureate Diploma program at Saint George’s and is also a college counselor. On top of that, he coaches soccer, basketball, and baseball. The notable achievement is made more impressive when you learn » More …

Power of words

Sandra Williams and a stack of Black Lens newspapers.When Sandy Williams (’83 psych.) was in the eighth grade, she discovered that only boys were allowed to take shop class, while girls had to take home economics. To Williams, this was unfair.

Instead of standing idly by, she wrote a persuasive essay calling for a change. Thanks to Williams, girls like her who had no interest in home economics could take shop if they wanted to. » More …

WSU Fight Song, composed by students, turns 100

WSU Fight Song music and photos of original composersAs the patriotic fervor from World War I began to subside, students at then-Washington State College found themselves uninspired by the songs associated with the school. Two senior music students, Zella Melcher of Spokane, Wash., and Phyllis Sayles of Lapwai, Idaho, took on the task of writing new music to energize the student body.

“They debuted their creation to great acclaim on Feb. 20, 1919, at a student body meeting in Bryan Hall, and one century later their Fight Song still inspires WSU students,” said Mark O’English, university archivist.

The Evergreen claimed it “at once scored a hit,” and declared » More …

International student-athlete reflects on WSU career

Linnea LindbergLIke many undergraduates, swimmer Linnea Lindberg says she now considers Pullman “home.”

The lone senior on the WSU swimming team, Lindberg is from Stockholm, Sweden, and is earning a degree in psychology at WSU Pullman.

“It is difficult to come to a new culture and experience a whole new place and language and everything,” Lindberg said.

Despite the geographical difference, Lindberg has enjoyed her time in Pullman. As she prepares for her final home swim meet, she fondly recalls » More …

A story of one student

James WhitbreadJames Whitbread, one of WSU’s 2018 Top Ten Seniors, is now attending Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“Medical school is everything I ever hoped it would be and more than I ever expected,” he shared in a post on the Department of Mathematics and Statistics website. Read on to learn more about his journey. >>  » More …

WSU med student elected to national association role

David ChoiMedical students at Washington State University have a national voice, thanks to David Choi (’16 biology).

A devoted Coug who graduated from WSU Vancouver and is now enrolled at the WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Choi was elected last spring to represent students in nine states as western region chair of the Association of American Medical Colleges’ student branch. » More …

Psychology student named Athlete of the Week

hir Levy passes the ball to her teammate.Shir Levy, freshman forward on the WSU women’s basketball team, might not pop off the stat sheet, but her defensive presence has kept her in the starting lineup and earned her “Athlete of the Week” from the Daily Evergreen.

Levy’s international experience, along with her freshman standing, makes her a very intriguing piece for the future of the WSU women’s basketball program. » More …

Fine arts alumna designs, shares iconic drawing

coloring book pageColoring isn’t just for kids any more: many mental health professionals say it’s a good way for adults to destress.

Thanks to Seattle artist and 2005 fine arts grad Tarah Luke, WSU is now part of the landscape. Luke found her niche in the adult coloring book industry and drew an abstract version of the iconic Bryan Hall clock tower for her fellow Cougars and Cougs at heart everywhere.

Luke was profiled in the Washington State Magazine Summer 2016 issue: read the full story below and download the coloring page! » More …