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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences oral history

Hiding in plain sight

Carla Olman.For many years, she never spoke about World War II.  “It was too difficult. You try to forget. You try to go on with life.”

But by the time 91-year-old Carla Olman Peperzak met Raymond Sun, a WSU associate professor of history, the former teenage operative in the Dutch Resistance had dedicated the rest of her life to telling her story.

“Her generation is disappearing very, very rapidly,” Sun says. “We’re really running out of these witnesses. There’s some sense of urgency to » More …

Golden and Diamond Grads: What a time it was!

Collage of alumni One by one, they share memories of curfews, 42-cent dinner dates at the CUB, the JFK assassination, and the birth of women’s lib. A few regale listeners with the infamous tale of the 1964 “Pot Push,” which had nothing to do with cannabis.

These are just a sample of the treats recorded at the Diamond and Golden Grads digital storytelling workshops, led by Rebecca Goodrich, clinical assistant professor in English and former assistant director of the Digital Technology and Culture program

The workshops, held during the Diamond and Golden reunions, are available to visiting 50- and 60-year graduates who would like to contribute oral histories of their time at WSU. The stories will eventually be » More …

African American history at Hanford focus of WSU-National Park Service project

(c) DOE Dupont Collection, waitress and customersWSU Tri-Cities will partner with the U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service to research and document the African American migration, segregation and overall civil rights history at the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, Hanford.

Michael Mays, WSU Tri-Cities director of the Hanford History Project, said the African American story and perspective remains largely undocumented and untold at the Hanford nuclear site, which is one of three locations of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

“The history of the science of the Manhattan Project is well known, but the social history, especially with regard to questions of race, class and gender, is much less clearly understood,” he said. » More …