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College of Arts and Sciences Chemistry

LIFT principles inspire teaching

Paul BuckleyA duck gliding across the surface of a lake often appears to be doing so with ease, but look below the surface and you’ll see the frenetic paddling required to make it happen.

If you think of college as the lake, and students as the ducks, you may find students experiencing the same phenomenon.

Paul Buckley, clinical associate professor in chemistry, recognized this comparison  after taking part in the LIFT Fellowship’s first cohort in » More …

Faculty receive Office of Research Awards

Kim Christen, Tammy Barry, and Peter Reilly.The WSU Office of Research presented awards to three faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences for their outstanding achievements in research as part of opening ceremonies for WSU Research Week.

Read more about Kim Christen (English), Tammy Barry (psychology), and Peter Reilly (chemistry) >> » More …

Chemistry prof to lead PAC-12 Academic Coalition

exterior of building with trees and large lawnAmy Nielsen, clinical assistant professor in chemistry and executive secretary of the WSU Faculty Senate, has been elected to a three-year term as executive director of the PAC-12 Academic Leadership Coalition.

The mission of the PAC-12 Academic Leadership Coalition is to improve the effectiveness and responsiveness of each member school’s shared governance organization and to facilitate » More …

$1 million Keck Foundation grant to develop self-replicating materials

Hipps Brozikfull in the labChemistry researchers at WSU have been awarded $1 million from the W.M. Keck Foundation to develop molecular machines that self-replicate, producing pounds of 100-percent pure material.

Their research is the first step towards a new paradigm in manufacturing where everything from smartphones to life-saving cancer drugs could be designed one atom at a time to exact specifications and then grown out of a vat.

“In the end, the product of this research is going to be a new field of science where we can make literally almost anything in a way only seen » More …

Grad student nabs $103,938 NIH research fellowship

Smiling grad studentA Washington State University graduate student turned the unexpected results from a laboratory experiment into a prestigious National Institutes of Health predoctoral fellowship.

Chemistry Ph.D. student Jacob Day is the recipient of the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award for the accidental discovery and subsequent development of a compound that enables scientists to investigate the protective role that sulfur dioxide plays in the heart.

The highly selective fellowship is awarded annually to top U.S. graduate students in health science-related fields. » More …

Chemists make major strides in organic semiconductors

figure from published paperWashington State University chemists have created new materials that pave the way for the development of inexpensive solar cells. Their work has been recognized as one of the most influential studies published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry in 2016.

Professors Ursula Mazur and K.W. Hipps, postdoctoral researcher Bhaskar Chilukuri and graduate students Morteza Adinehnia and Bryan Borders grew chain-like arrangements of organic nanostructures in the laboratory and then used mathematical models to determine which arrangements were the best conductors of light and electricity.

Journal editors recognized the WSU study as an important step in the advancement of organic semiconductors that perform on par with metal- and silicon-based electronics. They included the work in a collection of 2016’s most influential research publications, or “Hot Papers.”  » More …