Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences Archives

PhD research program leads to national laboratory

Electric car charging it's batter.Batteries developed by Shuo Feng could someday revolutionize the nation’s power grid and help electric vehicles go further on one charge than ever before.

Feng is one of five doctoral students who completed their doctorate program through the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Washington State University Distinguished Graduate Research Program (DGRP) in 2021. » More …

Student set sights on law school

Climaco Abarca.When Climaco Abarca was 15 years old, he lost the ability to walk following a diving accident. While the event changed the course of the WSU Tri-Cities junior’s life, it did not stop him from going to college and helping others in similar circumstances.

With the help of mentorship through school, Abarca discovered a career in law was feasible even from his wheelchair, and would allow him to make a positive » More …

Q&A with first-generation students

Hagedor, Burley, Rangel, and Wesley.A WSU system-wide celebration of National First-Generation Day on Monday, Nov. 8, honored first-generation students, faculty, and staff on each of our campuses. Meet four of our extraordinary CAS students:

Angela Hagedorn, a junior majoring in history; Brian Burley and Alma Rangel, both seniors majoring in psychology; and LaShay Wesley, a senior majoring in digital technology and culture. » More …

Dr. Universe: Why can’t we breathe in space?

Dr. UniverseOn Earth, humans have oxygen to breathe. But there’s very little oxygen to breathe in space.

Space is actually a kind of vacuum, which means there isn’t a whole lot of matter, or stuff, out there between the planets and the stars.

For Earthlings like you and me, oxygen is an essential part of life. While 21% of Earth’s atmosphere is oxygen, my friend Yimo Liu reminded me it wasn’t always that way. » More …

How Chinese pioneers helped build the Pacific Northwest

Polly Bemis sitting outside a cabin in Warren, IdahoThough often surprising to people today, Chinese immigrants once had a thriving population in the Inland Pacific Northwest. From their earliest days searching for gold to their later work constructing the Northern Pacific Railway, the Chinese endured discrimination and, in many cases, extreme brutality.

How it began

When word came that gold had been discovered in central California in 1849, many Chinese headed to » More …

Meet the new faculty of fall 2021

College of Arts and Sciences - Washington State University.Meet the college’s newest faculty, whose scholarly expertise and interests—from transnational geographies to transgender studies, culturally relevant music to immigration law, and mind and body awareness to fluids in the Earth’s crust—enrich and expand the arts and sciences at WSU. » More …

Improving WARNS, a K-12 at-risk assessment tool

Stacked books.An interdisciplinary team of Washington State University researchers received a $1.4 million grant from the Institute of Education Sciences to refine and expand the Washington Assessment of the Risks and Needs of Students program (WARNS), an assessment that helps address truancy in K-12 schools.

Developed in 2008, the program uses evidence-driven procedures to track and improve interventions with students. More than 100 schools in Washington state and across the nation » More …

Radio program connects NW past to present

Keren Phoenix and Brenna Miller.A Spokane resident whose invention transformed the shipping industry;  a woman who passed as a man and worked as a bartender, bronco buster, and longshoreman; plus preachers, prisoners, ranchers, immigrants, cowgirls, and soldiers are among the myriad people whose stories illuminate the history of the Northwest in Past as Prologue, a new radio program created by WSU historians Karen Phoenix and Brenna Miller. » More …

Nelson honored for teaching excellence

Lori Nelson drawing on a lightboard.An early adopter of the Looking Glass technology, Lori Nelson actively engages her biology students and promotes the development of a growth mindset in every course she teaches. She was honored with this year’s WSU Tri-Cities Distinguished Teaching Award in recognition of her commitment to improvement, thoughtful approach to course design, and development of classes that are creative, interesting, and fun. » More …