Skip to main content Skip to navigation
College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Mentors make the difference

woman at microscope by WSU TriCities Demi Galindo, a master’s student at WSU Tri-Cities, recently received a call that would change the course of her life.

She had been accepted to medical school. Better yet, she had received a tuition waiver for her four years of medical education, with the exception of two semesters during her third and fourth years – an acceptance package that is incredibly rare. » More …

CAS faculty initiatives to enhance future undergraduate education

CAS logo on white with borderFive College of Arts and Sciences faculty members have been selected to receive funding from the Samuel H. and Patricia W. Smith Teaching and Learning Endowment for four projects that will enhance undergraduate teaching and learning.

College of Arts and Sciences recipients of the 2018‑19 competitive grants and their projects are: » More …

Undergraduate Symposium highlights research and art

student explains research projectStudents highlighted their semester course projects, research, and art as part of the fall Undergraduate Research Symposium and Art Exhibition at WSU Tri-Cities.

“The symposium and art exhibition provides our students with an excellent opportunity to practice communicating their research and course projects, which is an essential skill for when they go out into the professional environment,” said Allison Matthews, clinical assistant professor of psychology. » More …

Helping students discover their potential

Anne Taylor.Washington State University Tri-Cities alumna Anne Taylor found her calling in higher education after experiencing what is possible through her own education at WSU.

The 2017 graduate earned her bachelor’s degree in social sciences and looking back on her educational experience at WSU Tri-Cities, it was the family atmosphere, the care that she personally experienced as a student and the great friendships that she built as a result of her time at WSU that made her realize that she would like to give back in the same way. » More …

Combining service and social sciences for success

Peter Nolan in uniform.Peter Nolan spent four years post-high school serving in the military police through the U.S. Army.

But as his enlisted contract came to a close, he decided to leave active duty to pursue college full-time because he knew an education would provide him with not only the background and know-how to succeed in a future job but  also greater career advancement options. » More …

Defining his own non-traditional path

graduate with familyFamily is core to who Geoff Schramm is as a friend, a person, but especially as a father and husband.

It’s the reason why he decided to go back to school at Washington State University Tri-Cities in his late 30s – a decision that led to many people asking him, “Why?”

» More …

Diversity, creativity lead to opportunity

Lian JacquezFor student Lian Jacquez, finding the ideal university fit was a bit of a challenge – that is, until he arrived at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Originally from eastern Oregon, he attended a university located in his home state, but found that the decision was an expensive one and more based on impulse than it was in finding a good fit for where he was at in his life. » More …

Students partner with local businesses, gain real-world writing experience

Students in a WSU Tri-Cities technical writing courseA technical writing course at WSU Tri-Cities partnered with local businesses and organizations to produce documents ranging from manuals, to booklets, to instruction guides. This opportunity allowed students to hone the skills they cultivated throughout the course to fulfill a real-world business need.

Vanessa Cozza, clinical assistant professor of English and instructor of the course, said the goals with the project were to provide students with a real-world opportunity that would add value back into their own community, while offering them a tangible example they could use in the future for their professional careers. » More …

Revealing how bacteria and grasses fix nitrogen

SwitchgrassReducing synthetic fertilizer use, pollution, farming costs, while freeing up nitrogen, mark possible benefits of a research project by Sarah Roley, assistant professor with the School of the Environment, Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Roley, and her two colleagues, recently landed a $483,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation, to pursue a more detailed understanding of how bacteria work with perennial grasses to fix nitrogen. » More …

Washington State University