Skip to main content Skip to navigation
College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Defining his own non-traditional path

graduate with familyFamily is core to who Geoff Schramm is as a friend, a person, but especially as a father and husband.

It’s the reason why he decided to go back to school at Washington State University Tri-Cities in his late 30s – a decision that led to many people asking him, “Why?”

» More …

Diversity, creativity lead to opportunity

Lian JacquezFor student Lian Jacquez, finding the ideal university fit was a bit of a challenge – that is, until he arrived at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Originally from eastern Oregon, he attended a university located in his home state, but found that the decision was an expensive one and more based on impulse than it was in finding a good fit for where he was at in his life. » More …

Students partner with local businesses, gain real-world writing experience

Students in a WSU Tri-Cities technical writing courseA technical writing course at WSU Tri-Cities partnered with local businesses and organizations to produce documents ranging from manuals, to booklets, to instruction guides. This opportunity allowed students to hone the skills they cultivated throughout the course to fulfill a real-world business need.

Vanessa Cozza, clinical assistant professor of English and instructor of the course, said the goals with the project were to provide students with a real-world opportunity that would add value back into their own community, while offering them a tangible example they could use in the future for their professional careers. » More …

Revealing how bacteria and grasses fix nitrogen

SwitchgrassReducing synthetic fertilizer use, pollution, farming costs, while freeing up nitrogen, mark possible benefits of a research project by Sarah Roley, assistant professor with the School of the Environment, Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Roley, and her two colleagues, recently landed a $483,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation, to pursue a more detailed understanding of how bacteria work with perennial grasses to fix nitrogen. » More …

Student projects earn Summer Scholars awards

Students working in a labFour student projects mentored by College of Arts and Sciences faculty were selected to receive $3,000 each as part of the 2018 WSU Tri-Cities Chancellor’s Summer Scholars program. The projects span environmental and biological sciences, mechanical and electrical engineering, and fine arts.

The Chancellor’s Summer Scholars Program offers students the opportunity to develop skills to » More …

Academic merger to bring new opportunities for students, faculty

A strategic plan to realign two departments and several degree programs in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) promises new opportunities in education, research, and outreach for students and faculty university-wide.

Approved by the WSU Board of Regents at their regular meeting on May 4, the realignment will combine personnel and resources in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures (FLC) with those in the Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies (CCGRS) and the interdisciplinary General Studies Humanities and Social Sciences programs to form a new School of Languages, Cultures, and Race. » More …

WSU flutist performs at Women Composers Festival of Hartford

Sophia TegartSophia Tegart, WSU clinical assistant professor of flute, performed two world premieres on April 7 at the Women Composers Festival of Hartford, with bassoonist Helena Spencer, University of North Carolina-Wilmington.

The festival, held at Trinity College in Hartford, attracts composers and performers internationally every year.

The premiered works for flute and bassoon were composed » More …

Analyzing fish skull development and evolutionary success

Jim Coopere holding a fish tankA biology researcher at WSU Tri-Cities aims to pinpoint underpinnings of evolutionary success by analyzing the skull morphology of a handful of fish species.

“One-third of living vertebrates belong to two fish lineages that independently evolved the ability to project their upper jaws forward from the face during feeding,” said Jim Cooper, assistant professor of biological sciences. “This jaw protrusion has been massively important to » More …

WSU, PNNL strengthen nuclear science research, education ties

Embracing the ‘power of partnerships,’ the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Washington State University announced the formation of the WSU-PNNL Institutes — a collection of three joint institutes that will advance science and technology in nuclear science and technology, advanced grid and bioproducts.

In a ceremony on April 3 at WSU Tri-Cities, located in Richland near PNNL’s research campus, institute leaders noted that these areas are critical for the nation and Northwest and solutions to major challenges are possible with these two institutions coming together. » More …

Crimson Spirit Award – Elly Sweet

Elly Sweet standing in front of the Brelsford WSU Visitor Center.Recipient of the WSU Crimson Spirit Award for March 2018 is Elly Sweet, a clinical assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences at WSU Tri-Cities.

Honored for her exceptional mentoring and outstanding contributions to the WSU community, Sweet is the faculty academic advisor for all certified majors in biology, general studies in biological sciences, and pre-health programs at WSU Tri-Cities. In addition to her teaching responsibilities, she advises more than » More …

Washington State University