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College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Creative Vancougs

photo of clouds in a valley by T.RiordanThe Salmon Creek Journal’s Annual Photo Competition, Travel Cafe, features the Vancouver campus community’s best shots from around the world. Submissions for this year’s theme of “Bliss” included images of beautiful landscapes, interesting uses of light and reflection, as well as the joy of human interaction. » More …

Scholarship impact: Vancouver’s “Wonder Woman”

Natalie EwingIf “life experience” were an academic program, Natalie Ewing, a social science and digital technology and culture double major, would already have her master’s degree.

Like many other nontraditional students, Ewing encountered her share of detours and unexpected turns along the path to college. Raised in California, she grew up amid drugs, alcohol, physical and emotional abuse, caring for her younger brother, unstable mother and alcoholic stepfather.

“Growing up, I always loved school, and I wanted to go to class more than anything in the world,” she said. » More …

2018 CAS awards honor faculty, staff, grad students

Fourteen faculty, three staff, and five graduate students were honored for outstanding achievement at the 2018 College of Arts and Sciences Appreciation and Recognition Social last week.

Regents Professor Kerry W. Hipps, an international leader in chemistry, and Barry Hewlett, a veteran anthropologist with a global reputation, received the top two faculty awards. Patricia Thorsten-Mickelson, a financial and personnel manager with more than three decades of experience at WSU, was honored with the outstanding staff career award.

“Our annual awards recognize individual achievement and are a wonderful opportunity to bring the college community together to celebrate » More …

17 CAS students honored with SURCA awards

Group of SURCA student award winnersFrom the health benefits of the Lucky Iron Fish to advances in detecting hydrogen polysufides to the cultural impact of a Brazilian composer’s work, 17 CAS students received top honors at the 2018 Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (SURCA) competition in April. Hosted by the Office of Undergraduate Research, SURCA features faculty-mentored research, scholarship, and creative activities by undergraduates from all majors, grades, and campuses.

“Each presentation evidences the new knowledge brought to one’s field and also reflects the personal and professional growth » More …

Director named for Meyer’s Point Environmental Field Station

Steve BollensStephen Bollens, professor of aquatic ecology at WSU Vancouver, has been named director of the newly designated Meyer’s Point Environmental Field Station.

Located just north of Olympia in a rapidly urbanizing area, Meyer’s Point is a 95-acre parcel of undeveloped land with 2,100 feet of Puget Sound shoreline and extensive terrestrial, wetland and aquatic habitats. The property was bequeathed to WSU in 1990 by Edward R. Meyer to be used to promote environmental education, research and the arts. » More …

CAS leads top 20 WSU research stories of 2017

From rising inequality and declining Monarch butterfly populations to a particle with negative mass, news coverage about the College of Arts and Sciences research reached millions of people last year.

News outlets carrying the stories ran the gamut of the nation’s most popular media, including CNN, The Washington Post and National Public Radio, as well as specialty science publications like Science and all the region’s major news vehicles. » More …

Historical detective story traces Indian Ocean slave saga

Illustration from book coverA detailed family saga set against the broader context of South Asian slavery, plantation life, Parisian society and French colonization, “Madeleine’s Children: Family, Freedom, Secrets, and Lies in France’s Indian Ocean Colonies” by history professor Sue Peabody traces the multigenerational biography of a slave family and their legal battles for freedom.

Peabody is one of the world’s leading authorities on slavery in the French Empire. The research took her to » More …

History professors launch community conversations

WSU Vancouver history professor Sue Peabody and adjunct professor Donna Sinclair were looking at the demographic records of Clark County, Washington, and noticed some surprising facts. The local population has more than doubled in the past three decades, from 221,654 to nearly 500,000 in 2017. And while more than half (54 percent) of the current residents were born in another state, another 10 percent of the county’s residents were born in another country altogether.

The data started them thinking: “How did all these people come to Clark County?” and “How is Clark County changing in response to this growth?” » More …

Bridging world history: African metalworking, Caribbean foods, and more

faculty portrait photograph, outsideAlthough she spent much of her career in administrative positions, history professor Candice Goucher has always thought of herself as a scholar first and foremost.

Her research combines the theories and methods of history, archaeology, ethnography, art history, ecology and chemistry. She is well known for her books and articles on African foodways, metallurgy, and popular and political culture, as well as global themes in world history. Candace is currently collaborating on “Striking Iron: The Arts of the African Blacksmith,” an exhibition set to open in June 2018 at the Fowler Museum in Los Angeles, and working on a related book and yet another volume about African ironworking. She’s also an award-winning food history author: her book on how European, African and Asian foods, » More …

Salmon face double whammy from toxic stormwater

SalmoWSU researchers have found that salmon face a double whammy when they swim in the stormwater runoff of urban roadways.

First, as scientists learned a couple years ago, toxic pollution in the water can kill them. WSU researchers have now determined that fish that survive polluted stormwater are still at risk.

Experiments on both larval zebrafish, a model for salmon, and actual coho salmon showed that toxic runoff can also damage hair-like sensors the fish use to find food, sense predators, and find their way in the current. » More …

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