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Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Examining socio‑economics of flexible rules

Resevior.An interdisciplinary team of WSU researchers has been awarded a $1.6 million grant to study under what conditions are individuals, groups and institutions likely to follow rules about the environment “to the letter” versus exercising discretion or making new rules.

“In the realm of science-based environmental management, it is useful to have flexibility to adapt to changing conditions, but it is also good to have clear rules as a basis for making investments toward long-term goals,” said John Harrison, Edward R. Meyer distinguished professor in » More …

Populous regions bear brunt of increasing humid‑heat

The sun over the city.The world is not only getting hotter but also more humid, and new research by WSU environmental scientists shows people living in areas where humid-heat extremes are already a significant hazard are bearing the brunt of the impact.

“We identify a greater increase in population exposure to humid-heat as compared to » More …

Digital media expert recognized for teaching excellence

Dene Grigar.There’s a reason why WSU Vancouver’s Creative Media and Digital Culture (CMDC) program has grown exponentially since it was founded in 1997: Dene Grigar, its director. Since she arrived on campus in 2006, the program has grown from 44 to 232 majors and serves 600 WSU Vancouver students each semester. Mindful of the competitive nature of » More …

Notable alumni award

Karissa Lowe.Meet cultural ambassador, program manager, and volunteer extraordinaire Karissa Lowe (’01 BA English, ’03 MA education).

After earning her degrees  at WSU Vancouver, she served as an elected member of the Cowlitz Tribal Council for 15 years, until 2020. During that same period, she sat on several Cowlitz Tribal boards, the Grantmakers of Oregon and » More …

Students create virtual museum of digital literature

The NEXT.A virtual museum and library of more than 2,500 digital literary works from around the world is now accessible thanks to the collaborative work of more than three dozen recent graduates of WSU Vancouver’s Creative Media and Digital Culture program.

Called The NEXT, it was created for the Electronic Literature Organization, an international arts group currently housed » More …

The notorious “Tacoma Method”

Xiuyu WangOn a miserably cold November day in 1885, a mob of 500 White businessmen, police, and political leaders stormed Tacoma’s Chinatown, determined to immediately force out the residents.

“This so-called, and notorious, ‘Tacoma Method’ was lauded by Tacomans and other city leaders as a lawful and orderly way to expel the Chinese population from town,” says Xiuyu Wang, associate professor of history at WSU Vancouver and a » More …

$1.12M grant to help increase math teacher diversity

Silhouette of a person writing on a white board. William Hall, assistant professor of mathematics, knows the tremendous impact high school math teachers can have on how students learn to think and reason quantitatively, and that includes matters of civics, social justice, and fairness.

“It is not always clear that you can be passionate about those ideas and use a career in teaching high school mathematics to explore them further and serve your community at the same time,” he said. » More …

Where math and poetry intersect

James Owusu Asare.As a seven-year-old, James Owusu Asare developed an unusual hobby: he would sit quietly at home in Accra, Ghana, writing lines of poetry. By age 15, he realized he had a special ability and began to take it more seriously. But when it came time to go to university, Asare decided to study math even though it was his weakest subject as a child. » More …

Testing arrest deferrals, early release amid the pandemic

County jail.Sociology professor Jennifer Sherman studies rural jails in eastern Washington. Together with fellow WSU sociologists Jennifer Schwartz and Clay Mosher, she investigates why rural jail populations are on the rise despite declines in urban and suburban jails.

“Our research began before the pandemic hit, so we did our best to adapt and used COVID as a natural experiment,” Sherman says. “We learned a lot about the resilience of our communities by » More …