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College of Arts and Sciences painting

With a pencil or brush or horse

Don Weller with his dog.His canvases are mostly covered with cowboys and horses now, along with their accompaniments—saddles and chaps, barns and fences, cows, canyons, rivers, red rocks, ropes—all things he’s loved from an early age.

Don Weller (’60 Fine Arts) worked for decades as an illustrator and graphic designer before making a second career of painting images of rodeos and ranches and, in a sense, getting back in touch with » More …

Exploring ‘internet addiction’ with paintings

Artwork by Joe Hedges.Among fine arts faculty member Joe Hedges‘s latest artworks are oil paintings of beautiful landscapes with a twist. They incorporate flat screen televisions, smart phones, or other objects to become what he calls “Hypercombines”—paintings that are connected to the internet.

“I started thinking about this buzz phrase that was going around a few years ago, ‘the internet of things,’ and asking myself why couldn’t an oil painting be part of the internet of things? What would that look like?” he asked. » More …

Casting an artful brush

Ben Miller fly fishing.The idea came to him during a phone call. The artist and avid fly fisherman was talking with his brother when he suddenly wondered whether it would be possible to combine his two loves in a way he hadn’t seen before. Could he use the same tool to catch fish as well as make art illustrating their natural habitat? Could he paint the rivers he loves to fish with a fly rod instead of a brush?

“A good fly fisherman is going to be really precise with » More …

Curating community and conversation

Sydney MurphyWSU senior Sidney Murphy, curator of a special six-week exhibit at WSU’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, sees art as a path to a more honest, open, and liberating future.

Standing in front of the four panels of Myriads, Only by Dark by Julie Mehretu, Murphy says of the Ethiopian-American artist, “Mehretu focuses a lot on topology, maps, the connections we have between places—that’s my interpretation. This idea of place is messy, of where we come from, really messy.” She tosses off a small laugh. “You can’t really follow one line.” » More …

Fine Arts gallery showcases faculty work

Artwork by David Janssen Jr.When looking for art on campus, you might think only of the crimson cube of the recently opened Schnitzer art museum. But did you know there are several galleries in the Fine Arts building where WSU students and professors often exhibit their work?

Recently, David Janssen Jr., an art instructor with a specialty in 2D foundations, displayed a collection of his paintings entitled “Between Us” in Gallery 2. » More …

Artist sculpts future with past

Student working in art studioSenior fine arts major Victoria De Leon meanders through campus from Stevens Hall to Southside Café. She builds her own soup in the dining hall and proceeds to a table in the back near the windows.

From her backpack, she removes a black sketchbook that is falling apart at the spine. She sifts through the pages, displaying miscellaneous words and sewn-in textiles.

“It’s a lot more taking notes than drawing because I feel like with certain words,” she says, “it triggers different images in my head. » More …