Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Washington State University
College of Arts and Sciences Archives

Opioids kill minorities at younger ages

AlthoughOutline of the state of Washington filled with the image of an ambulance and opioids in the background. opioid use cuts across socio-economic boundaries, WSU researchers have found racial and ethnic minorities in Washington state are more likely to die from an overdose earlier in their lives than non-Hispanic white residents.

“This work confirms the epidemic is far reaching and having dramatic impacts on quality and length of life for Americans of all » More …

Food insecurity related to later diabetes

Man opening an empty-looking refrigerator late at night.An interdisciplinary study of adolescence-to-adult health found young adults who were at risk of food insecurity had an increased incidence of diabetes 10 years later.

WSU researchers in sociology, medicine, and nursing analyzed data on nearly 4,000 people from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. They found that adults ages 24–32 who said they’d been » More …

New biomarkers could predict rheumatoid arthritis

Close up of a woman's hands, one holding the other in pain.Cells from a cheek swab revealed biomarkers for rheumatoid arthritis that could lead to a way to diagnose and begin treatment before the disease develops, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

In the study, researchers from Washington State University and Arthritis Northwest in Spokane, Washington, identified a set of epimutations in cells from » More …

Assessing the emotional impact of sleep loss

A man sits on a public bench rubbing his eyes.A new WSU study shows sleep loss is not likely to interfere with our ability to evaluate emotional situations, but it is likely to make us less able to control our own emotional responses.

The findings have implications for healthcare providers, law enforcement and people in other long-hour professions who need » More …

Study shows recovery can start without sobriety

People at a table with coffee.Harm reduction treatment helped people experiencing homelessness and alcohol use disorder reduce their drinking and improve their health–even if they didn’t quit drinking alcohol.

“This approach has the potential to help anybody who would like to change their alcohol use but might not be ready or able to stop entirely,” said WSU psychology professor Susan » More …

Examining risks, benefits of breastfeeding during COVID-19

Woman with infant. COVID-19 has brought with it new questions related to the benefits and/or potential risks of breastfeeding during this pandemic. Is the SARS-COV2 virus present in breast milk and could it be transmitted from mom to baby? Could antibodies found in breast milk actually help protect babies from the SARS-COV2 virus?

Researchers at WSU are leading a new nationwide study on COVID-19 and infant feeding to help answer these questions. Their work could ultimately help scientists better understand how COVID-19 affects the health and immune responses of mothers and » More …

Interdisciplinary research on COVID-19 impact

Mother holding sleeping baby.Fifteen faculty and graduate student researchers from multiple colleges and campuses across the University recently joined forces to form the WSU COVID‑19 Infant, Maternal, and Family Health Research Collaborative.

Spanning a variety of disciplines, including biological sciences, anthropology, and psychology, the collective already has a half dozen studies lined up to address critical questions related to the impact of COVID‑19 on the health of mothers, babies, and families. » More …

A better sense of health monitoring

Illustration from scientific paper

With at least 30 million Americans currently diagnosed with diabetes and an estimated 84 million more at risk of developing the disease, the need for simpler treatments is urgent. WSU researchers are working to take the sting out of daily management with sophisticated new technologies and personalized medicine.

“One of the difficulties of diabetes is that it can feel overwhelming to have to take pills, check blood sugar, and poke your finger several times a day” says Joshua Neumiller (’03 Phys. Sci., ’05 DPH Pharm.), WSU’s Allen I. White Distinguished » More …

WSU med student elected to national association role

David ChoiMedical students at Washington State University have a national voice, thanks to David Choi (’16 biology).

A devoted Coug who graduated from WSU Vancouver and is now enrolled at the WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Choi was elected last spring to represent students in nine states as western region chair of the Association of American Medical Colleges’ student branch. » More …

Researchers see gene influencing performance of sleep-deprived people

Woman sleeping on a pillow at a deskWashington State University researchers have discovered a genetic variation that predicts how well people perform certain mental tasks when they are sleep deprived.

Their research shows that individuals with a particular variation of the DRD2 gene are resilient to the effects of sleep deprivation when completing tasks that require cognitive flexibility, the ability to make appropriate decisions based on changing information.

» More …