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College of Arts and Sciences English

Homer on a flash drive

Grigar in her computer lab.Plato is sitting at the feet of his mentor Socrates, writing down what the old philosopher says. What Socrates is saying, ironically, is that writing is bad for you: It rots your memory. Preserved in Plato’s Phaedrus, Socrates’s opinion of the then-emerging technology sounds strange to us now—until you recall that that’s pretty much exactly what pundits in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have been saying about TV, video games, and texting.

Dene Grigar, director of Washington State University Vancouver’s program in Creative Media and Digital Culture, laughs and nods. She’s also the president of the Electronic Literature Organization, an international team of scholars and artists dedicated to creating, preserving and evangelizing “born-digital” art and literature. » More …

Digital Technology and Culture newsletter, October 2017

screen shot of DTC newsletterFrom winning awards to winning grants, new courses and new equipment, the Digital Technology and Culture faculty and staff are working hard to expand our reach, notoriety, and resources. Our goal is to continue to empower the DTC students who inspire us each and every day. Read the full DTC e-newsletter >>

 

African American history at Hanford focus of WSU-National Park Service project

(c) DOE Dupont Collection, waitress and customersWSU Tri-Cities will partner with the U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service to research and document the African American migration, segregation and overall civil rights history at the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, Hanford.

Michael Mays, WSU Tri-Cities director of the Hanford History Project, said the African American story and perspective remains largely undocumented and untold at the Hanford nuclear site, which is one of three locations of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

“The history of the science of the Manhattan Project is well known, but the social history, especially with regard to questions of race, class and gender, is much less clearly understood,” he said. » More …

Where the trouble began

book cover and author portrait image“Fiction is a document of trouble,” says novelist James Thayer ’71. The trouble began for Thayer as a teenager reading Bram Stoker’s Dracula on his father’s wheat farm in Almira.

“The narrator sees the Count leap to a window frame—and then crawl down the exterior of the castle wall like a lizard!” Thayer exclaims. “That scene scared me to death! It was a revelation as to the power of fiction.”

Now, decades later, the Seattle-based author of 14 novels teaches fiction writing through the University of Washington’s continuing education program. » More …

WSU-led cultural preservation initiative wins exemplary service award

The Society of American Archivists conferred its Council Exemplary Service Award to the Sustainable Heritage Network, a WSU-led project for digital preservation of cultural heritage managed by the Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation.

Read more at WSU News >>

WSU center receives $147,179 to expand Native American archive

WSU’s Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation recently received a $147,179 Digital Extension Grant from the American Council of Learned Societies to expand the Plateau Peoples’ Web Portal, a national archive of Native American cultural materials.

Read more at WSU News >>